Human Papillomavirus Vaccination and Pap Smear Rates Among Burmese Refugee Girls in a Healthcare System in Omaha, Nebraska

Dorothy Xuanxian Kenny, Katherine Hsueh, Ryan William Walters, John Joseph Coté

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccinations and Pap smear screenings are known to improve the survival rates and incidence of cervical cancer, refugee populations have traditionally been disadvantaged within this arena. Due to past and recent political issues in Myanmar, Burmese refugee women in Nebraska may be at particular risk due to their increasing numbers. This study examined 65 female Burmese refugees who were candidates for HPV vaccinations and 106 female Burmese refugees who could have received Pap smear screenings between 2010 and 2020. Of the 65 patients aged 11–26, 49.2% initiated the HPV vaccine series and 30.8% completed the series. In patients aged 13–17, 86.4% initiated the vaccine series and 54.6% completed the series. Of the 106 patients over 18 years of age, 32.1% had a Pap smear within the last 3 years. The need to improve HPV vaccine and Pap smear rates in refugee populations is clear. While focusing on the designated refugee exam may have improved HPV vaccine rates, it is important to examine gaps in knowledge with regards to attitudes surrounding HPV vaccines and Pap smears within the Burmese refugee population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Community Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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