Ignatius of Loyola on medical education. Or: Should todays Jesuits continue to run health sciences schools?

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are at present 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States, which together offer more than 50 health sciences degree programs. But as the Society's membership is shrinking and the financial risks involved in sponsoring health sciences education are rising, the question arises whether the Society should continue to sponsor health sciences degree programs. In fact, at least eight Jesuit health sciences schools have already closed their doors. This paper attempts to contribute to the resolution of this urgent question by reexamining Ignatius' own views on health sciences education and, more specifically, his prohibition of the Society's sponsoring medical education. It concludes on the basis of an historical analysis of Ignatius' views that there is insufficient support for today's ,Jesuits to maintain their engagement in medical and health care education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-43
Number of pages18
JournalEarly Science and Medicine
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

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School Health Services
Medical Education
Health Education
Health
Jesuits
Ignatius Loyola
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • History and Philosophy of Science
  • General
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "There are at present 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States, which together offer more than 50 health sciences degree programs. But as the Society's membership is shrinking and the financial risks involved in sponsoring health sciences education are rising, the question arises whether the Society should continue to sponsor health sciences degree programs. In fact, at least eight Jesuit health sciences schools have already closed their doors. This paper attempts to contribute to the resolution of this urgent question by reexamining Ignatius' own views on health sciences education and, more specifically, his prohibition of the Society's sponsoring medical education. It concludes on the basis of an historical analysis of Ignatius' views that there is insufficient support for today's ,Jesuits to maintain their engagement in medical and health care education.",
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