Immunomodulation in the treatment and/or prevention of bronchial asthma

Robert G. Townley, Russell J. Hopp, Devendra K. Agrawal, Thomas B. Casale, Michael T. Hopfenspirger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The immunologic hallmark of atopic allergy and asthma is an increased production of IgE and T helper (h) type 2 cell cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13) by Th cells reacting to common environmental allergens. All of us inhale allergens and healthy non-atopics produce allergen-specific IgG1, IgG4 and the Th1 cytokine interferon-α, as well as IL-12 from macrophages. We now have many modalities of immunomodulation to decrease the effect of IL-4 or IL-5 or production and level of IgE or agents to shift the immune response from a Th2 to a Th1 response, thereby decreasing the allergic inflammatory response in the airways. In the present review we focus on conventional immunotherapy, mycobacterial vaccines, DNA vaccines using cytosine guanosine, inhibitors of IL-4 and IL-5 and anti-IgE: Omalizumab.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalAllergology International
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Immunomodulation
Interleukin-5
Interleukin-4
Allergens
Asthma
Immunoglobulin E
Immunoglobulin G
Interleukin-9
Cytokines
Th2 Cells
DNA Vaccines
Interleukin-13
Guanosine
Cytosine
Interleukin-12
Immunotherapy
Interferons
Hypersensitivity
Therapeutics
Vaccines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Immunomodulation in the treatment and/or prevention of bronchial asthma. / Townley, Robert G.; Hopp, Russell J.; Agrawal, Devendra K.; Casale, Thomas B.; Hopfenspirger, Michael T.

In: Allergology International, Vol. 51, No. 2, 2002, p. 63-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Townley, Robert G. ; Hopp, Russell J. ; Agrawal, Devendra K. ; Casale, Thomas B. ; Hopfenspirger, Michael T. / Immunomodulation in the treatment and/or prevention of bronchial asthma. In: Allergology International. 2002 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 63-73.
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