Impact of functional testing results on prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Results from the ROSETTA-CABG Registry

Karen Wou, Hiep Nguyen, Robert Duerr, Michael Del Core, Dominique Fourchy, Thao Huynh, Ellis Lader, Felix J. Rogers, Rashid Chaudhry, Louise Pilote, Mark J. Eisenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is known to reduce angina, previous studies have suggested that anti-anginal medication use is not significantly reduced after CABG. However, it is unclear how functional testing results have an impact on anti-anginal medication prescription patterns. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether post-CABG functional testing results impact prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication during the 12 months after CABG. METHODS: The Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery (ROSETTA-CABG) Registry is a prospective, multicenter study. We examined anti-anginal medication use (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and nitrates) at discharge and at 12 months post-CABG with respect to functional testing results among 392 patients. RESULTS: Among the 392 patients, 146 had at least one functional test over the 12-month follow up period. Among the 146 patients, 17% had positive functional tests, 69% had negative tests, and 14% had indeterminate tests. Both beta blocker and calcium channel blocker use did not increase from discharge to 12 months following a positive test (N ≤ 25) (84% vs. 80%; p ≤ NS; 16% vs. 16%; p ≤ NS), while nitrate use increased seven-fold (4% vs. 28%; p ≤ 0.03). However, following a negative test (N ≤ 100), beta blocker use only decreased modestly (85% vs. 70%; p ≤ 0.01), while both calcium channel blocker and nitrate use were unchanged (30% vs. 20%; p ≤ NS; 4% vs. 6%; p ≤ NS, respectively). Following an indeterminate test (N ≤ 21), anti-anginal medication use was unchanged (p ≤ NS for all 3 classes of medication). CONCLUSION: The use of anti-anginal medication is only modestly reduced after CABG, and functional testing results during the first year post-CABG do not have a strong impact on prescription patterns of anti-anginal agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)278-282
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume18
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Coronary Artery Bypass
Prescriptions
Registries
Exercise
Transplants
Calcium Channel Blockers
montirelin
Nitrates
Multicenter Studies
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Impact of functional testing results on prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery : Results from the ROSETTA-CABG Registry. / Wou, Karen; Nguyen, Hiep; Duerr, Robert; Del Core, Michael; Fourchy, Dominique; Huynh, Thao; Lader, Ellis; Rogers, Felix J.; Chaudhry, Rashid; Pilote, Louise; Eisenberg, Mark J.

In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology, Vol. 18, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 278-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wou, K, Nguyen, H, Duerr, R, Del Core, M, Fourchy, D, Huynh, T, Lader, E, Rogers, FJ, Chaudhry, R, Pilote, L & Eisenberg, MJ 2006, 'Impact of functional testing results on prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: Results from the ROSETTA-CABG Registry', Journal of Invasive Cardiology, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 278-282.
Wou, Karen ; Nguyen, Hiep ; Duerr, Robert ; Del Core, Michael ; Fourchy, Dominique ; Huynh, Thao ; Lader, Ellis ; Rogers, Felix J. ; Chaudhry, Rashid ; Pilote, Louise ; Eisenberg, Mark J. / Impact of functional testing results on prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery : Results from the ROSETTA-CABG Registry. In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology. 2006 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 278-282.
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title = "Impact of functional testing results on prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: Results from the ROSETTA-CABG Registry",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is known to reduce angina, previous studies have suggested that anti-anginal medication use is not significantly reduced after CABG. However, it is unclear how functional testing results have an impact on anti-anginal medication prescription patterns. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether post-CABG functional testing results impact prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication during the 12 months after CABG. METHODS: The Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery (ROSETTA-CABG) Registry is a prospective, multicenter study. We examined anti-anginal medication use (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and nitrates) at discharge and at 12 months post-CABG with respect to functional testing results among 392 patients. RESULTS: Among the 392 patients, 146 had at least one functional test over the 12-month follow up period. Among the 146 patients, 17{\%} had positive functional tests, 69{\%} had negative tests, and 14{\%} had indeterminate tests. Both beta blocker and calcium channel blocker use did not increase from discharge to 12 months following a positive test (N ≤ 25) (84{\%} vs. 80{\%}; p ≤ NS; 16{\%} vs. 16{\%}; p ≤ NS), while nitrate use increased seven-fold (4{\%} vs. 28{\%}; p ≤ 0.03). However, following a negative test (N ≤ 100), beta blocker use only decreased modestly (85{\%} vs. 70{\%}; p ≤ 0.01), while both calcium channel blocker and nitrate use were unchanged (30{\%} vs. 20{\%}; p ≤ NS; 4{\%} vs. 6{\%}; p ≤ NS, respectively). Following an indeterminate test (N ≤ 21), anti-anginal medication use was unchanged (p ≤ NS for all 3 classes of medication). CONCLUSION: The use of anti-anginal medication is only modestly reduced after CABG, and functional testing results during the first year post-CABG do not have a strong impact on prescription patterns of anti-anginal agents.",
author = "Karen Wou and Hiep Nguyen and Robert Duerr and {Del Core}, Michael and Dominique Fourchy and Thao Huynh and Ellis Lader and Rogers, {Felix J.} and Rashid Chaudhry and Louise Pilote and Eisenberg, {Mark J.}",
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T1 - Impact of functional testing results on prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

T2 - Results from the ROSETTA-CABG Registry

AU - Wou, Karen

AU - Nguyen, Hiep

AU - Duerr, Robert

AU - Del Core, Michael

AU - Fourchy, Dominique

AU - Huynh, Thao

AU - Lader, Ellis

AU - Rogers, Felix J.

AU - Chaudhry, Rashid

AU - Pilote, Louise

AU - Eisenberg, Mark J.

PY - 2006/6

Y1 - 2006/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Although coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is known to reduce angina, previous studies have suggested that anti-anginal medication use is not significantly reduced after CABG. However, it is unclear how functional testing results have an impact on anti-anginal medication prescription patterns. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether post-CABG functional testing results impact prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication during the 12 months after CABG. METHODS: The Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery (ROSETTA-CABG) Registry is a prospective, multicenter study. We examined anti-anginal medication use (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and nitrates) at discharge and at 12 months post-CABG with respect to functional testing results among 392 patients. RESULTS: Among the 392 patients, 146 had at least one functional test over the 12-month follow up period. Among the 146 patients, 17% had positive functional tests, 69% had negative tests, and 14% had indeterminate tests. Both beta blocker and calcium channel blocker use did not increase from discharge to 12 months following a positive test (N ≤ 25) (84% vs. 80%; p ≤ NS; 16% vs. 16%; p ≤ NS), while nitrate use increased seven-fold (4% vs. 28%; p ≤ 0.03). However, following a negative test (N ≤ 100), beta blocker use only decreased modestly (85% vs. 70%; p ≤ 0.01), while both calcium channel blocker and nitrate use were unchanged (30% vs. 20%; p ≤ NS; 4% vs. 6%; p ≤ NS, respectively). Following an indeterminate test (N ≤ 21), anti-anginal medication use was unchanged (p ≤ NS for all 3 classes of medication). CONCLUSION: The use of anti-anginal medication is only modestly reduced after CABG, and functional testing results during the first year post-CABG do not have a strong impact on prescription patterns of anti-anginal agents.

AB - BACKGROUND: Although coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is known to reduce angina, previous studies have suggested that anti-anginal medication use is not significantly reduced after CABG. However, it is unclear how functional testing results have an impact on anti-anginal medication prescription patterns. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether post-CABG functional testing results impact prescription patterns of anti-anginal medication during the 12 months after CABG. METHODS: The Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery (ROSETTA-CABG) Registry is a prospective, multicenter study. We examined anti-anginal medication use (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and nitrates) at discharge and at 12 months post-CABG with respect to functional testing results among 392 patients. RESULTS: Among the 392 patients, 146 had at least one functional test over the 12-month follow up period. Among the 146 patients, 17% had positive functional tests, 69% had negative tests, and 14% had indeterminate tests. Both beta blocker and calcium channel blocker use did not increase from discharge to 12 months following a positive test (N ≤ 25) (84% vs. 80%; p ≤ NS; 16% vs. 16%; p ≤ NS), while nitrate use increased seven-fold (4% vs. 28%; p ≤ 0.03). However, following a negative test (N ≤ 100), beta blocker use only decreased modestly (85% vs. 70%; p ≤ 0.01), while both calcium channel blocker and nitrate use were unchanged (30% vs. 20%; p ≤ NS; 4% vs. 6%; p ≤ NS, respectively). Following an indeterminate test (N ≤ 21), anti-anginal medication use was unchanged (p ≤ NS for all 3 classes of medication). CONCLUSION: The use of anti-anginal medication is only modestly reduced after CABG, and functional testing results during the first year post-CABG do not have a strong impact on prescription patterns of anti-anginal agents.

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