Impact of pleural manometry on the development of chest discomfort during thoracentesis a symptom-based study

Jasleen Pannu, Zachary Depew, John J. Mullon, Craig E. Daniels, Clinton E. Hagen, Fabien Maldonado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Routine manometry is recommended to prevent complications during therapeutic thoracentesis, but has not definitively been shown to prevent pneu-mothorax or reexpansion pulmonary edema. As chest discomfort correlates with negative pleural pressures, we aimed to determine whether the use of manometry could anticipate the development of chest discomfort during therapeutic thoracentesis. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 214 consecutive adults who underwent outpatient therapeutic thoracentesis at our institution between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2013 was performed. We compared preprocedural to postprocedural discomfort (using a linear analog scale from 0 to 10) in patients undergoing thoracentesis with or without manometry. We used a multivariate model to adjust for possible confounders. Changes of dyspnea scores were also analyzed. Results: Manometry was performed in 82/214 patients (38%). On univariate and multivariate analyses, neither the change in chest discomfort nor dyspnea scores was significantly different in the manometry versus the control group (P = 0.12 and 0.24, respectively). Similar results were also found in the subgroup of large-volume thoracentesis (P = 0.32 for discomfort, P=1.0 for dyspnea). Conclusions: In our retrospective study, the use of manometry did not appear to anticipate the development of chest discomfort during therapeutic thor-acentesis. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)306-313
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology
Volume21
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Manometry
Thorax
Dyspnea
Pulmonary Edema
Therapeutics
Thoracentesis
Outpatients
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Prospective Studies
Pressure
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Impact of pleural manometry on the development of chest discomfort during thoracentesis a symptom-based study. / Pannu, Jasleen; Depew, Zachary; Mullon, John J.; Daniels, Craig E.; Hagen, Clinton E.; Maldonado, Fabien.

In: Journal of Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.10.2014, p. 306-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pannu, Jasleen ; Depew, Zachary ; Mullon, John J. ; Daniels, Craig E. ; Hagen, Clinton E. ; Maldonado, Fabien. / Impact of pleural manometry on the development of chest discomfort during thoracentesis a symptom-based study. In: Journal of Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 306-313.
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