Implementing lifestyle medicine with medication therapy management services to improve patient-centered health care

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe a patient-centered medication therapy management (MTM) program that focuses on lifestyle medicine. Setting: Community pharmacy in Omaha, NE, from August 2008 to September 2010. Practice description: Traditional MTM services are combined with lifestyle medicine interventions for employees of a self-insured organization who have dyslipidemia, hypertension, and/or diabetes. Program participants meet one-on-one with a pharmacist 12 times during the first year of the program to ensure proper drug therapy and modify lifestyle behaviors (physical activity, nutrition, weight control, sleep, stress, and alcohol and tobacco use) through individualized programming. Practice innovation: Several patient-centered activities have been developed for the program with an emphasis on modifying lifestyle behaviors in conjunction with medications to manage participants' chronic condition. In addition, a new specialty position in health care is being developed (the ambulatist) that focuses on maintaining the ambulatory status of individuals with chronic medical conditions through appropriate drug therapy, lifestyle medicine, and care coordination. Main outcome measures: Biometric data collection and participant survey data at baseline and after 12 months. Results: Pilot data for 15 participants showed improvements in all measurements, including blood cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood glucose, body weight, physical activity level, fruit and vegetable intake, risk for myocardial infarction, risk for any cardiovascular disease event, self-reported unhealthy days, and qualitative survey data. Conclusion: Pharmacists are in an ideal position to implement lifestyle medicine strategies in combination with MTM services to enhance patient-centered health care in a community pharmacy setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-188
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Medication Therapy Management
Patient-Centered Care
Health care
Medicine
Life Style
Delivery of Health Care
Drug therapy
Pharmacies
Weight control
Pharmacists
Tobacco
Cholesterol
Vegetables
Biometrics
Nutrition
Medical problems
Fruits
Exercise
LDL Cholesterol
Blood Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: To describe a patient-centered medication therapy management (MTM) program that focuses on lifestyle medicine. Setting: Community pharmacy in Omaha, NE, from August 2008 to September 2010. Practice description: Traditional MTM services are combined with lifestyle medicine interventions for employees of a self-insured organization who have dyslipidemia, hypertension, and/or diabetes. Program participants meet one-on-one with a pharmacist 12 times during the first year of the program to ensure proper drug therapy and modify lifestyle behaviors (physical activity, nutrition, weight control, sleep, stress, and alcohol and tobacco use) through individualized programming. Practice innovation: Several patient-centered activities have been developed for the program with an emphasis on modifying lifestyle behaviors in conjunction with medications to manage participants' chronic condition. In addition, a new specialty position in health care is being developed (the ambulatist) that focuses on maintaining the ambulatory status of individuals with chronic medical conditions through appropriate drug therapy, lifestyle medicine, and care coordination. Main outcome measures: Biometric data collection and participant survey data at baseline and after 12 months. Results: Pilot data for 15 participants showed improvements in all measurements, including blood cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood glucose, body weight, physical activity level, fruit and vegetable intake, risk for myocardial infarction, risk for any cardiovascular disease event, self-reported unhealthy days, and qualitative survey data. Conclusion: Pharmacists are in an ideal position to implement lifestyle medicine strategies in combination with MTM services to enhance patient-centered health care in a community pharmacy setting.",
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