Inferior glenohumeral dislocation

Kusum Saxena, Joseph Stavas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Presented is the case of a 55-year-old alcoholic with an inferior glenohumeral dislocation of his right shoulder. The patient was unable to move his right arm, which was flexed at the elbow and locked in an overhead position. After roentgenographic confirmation of the dislocation, traction-counter-traction was employed for reduction. Reduction was indicated by an audible click. The shoulder was immobilized and the patient was discharged for follow up in two weeks. Luxatio erecta is the result of a severe hyperabduction mechanism frequently associated with significant rotator cuff injury. Immediate reduction followed by surgical repair of the rotator cuff at a later date is the standard treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-720
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Shoulder Dislocation
Traction
Joint Dislocations
Rotator Cuff
Elbow
Arm
Therapeutics
Rotator Cuff Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Inferior glenohumeral dislocation. / Saxena, Kusum; Stavas, Joseph.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 11, 1983, p. 718-720.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saxena, Kusum ; Stavas, Joseph. / Inferior glenohumeral dislocation. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 1983 ; Vol. 12, No. 11. pp. 718-720.
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