Insulin treatment of post-prandial hyperglycemia

Marc S. Rendell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With evidence that elevated post-prandial glucose (PPG) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is increasing emphasis on primary treatment of PPG in diabetes. The carbohydrate content of a meal is the principal contribution to PPG, so efforts to reduce carbohydrate ingestion are an important dietary approach to management. Although all oral hypoglycemics reduce PPG, newer agents including disaccharidase inhibitors and meglitinides act more selectively to lower PPG. GLP-1 agonists and pramlintide act primarily on post-meal glucose. DPP-IV inhibitors are oral agents that raise GLP-1 levels. Unquestionably, exogenous insulin is the most potent agent to lower PPG levels. Long-acting basal insulin has much less effect on PPG than rapid-acting insulin taken at the time of a meal. Inhaled insulin is no more effective than injectable insulin but is much more acceptable to most patients and may thus lead to administration of insulin earlier in the course of type II diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-129
Number of pages6
JournalDrug Development Research
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

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Hyperglycemia
Meals
Insulin
Glucose
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Therapeutics
Medical problems
Carbohydrates
Short-Acting Insulin
Disaccharidases
Long-Acting Insulin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Eating
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Insulin treatment of post-prandial hyperglycemia. / Rendell, Marc S.

In: Drug Development Research, Vol. 69, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 124-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rendell, Marc S. / Insulin treatment of post-prandial hyperglycemia. In: Drug Development Research. 2008 ; Vol. 69, No. 3. pp. 124-129.
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