International trends in the uptake of cancer risk reduction strategies in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation

the Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation face high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. In the current study, we report on uptake of cancer screening and risk-reduction options in a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers from ten countries over two time periods (1995 to 2008 and 2009 to 2017). Methods: Eligible subjects were identified from an international database of female BRCA mutation carriers and included women from 59 centres from ten countries. Subjects completed a questionnaire at the time of genetic testing, which included past use of cancer prevention options and screening tests. Biennial follow-up questionnaires were administered. Results: Six-thousand two-hundred and twenty-three women were followed for a mean of 7.5 years. The mean age at last follow-up was 52.1 years (27–96 years) and 42.3% of the women had a prior diagnosis of breast cancer. In all, 27.8% had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and 64.7% had a BSO. Screening with breast MRI increased from 70% before 2009 to 81% at or after 2009. There were significant differences in uptake of all options by country. Conclusion: For women who received genetic testing more recently, uptake of prophylactic mastectomy and breast MRI is significantly higher than those who received genetic testing more than 10 years ago. However, uptake of both BSO and breast MRI is not optimal, and interventions to increase uptake are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Risk Reduction Behavior
Genetic Testing
Mutation
Breast
Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
Ovarian Neoplasms
Databases
Prophylactic Mastectomy
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

International trends in the uptake of cancer risk reduction strategies in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. / the Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group.

In: British Journal of Cancer, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "International trends in the uptake of cancer risk reduction strategies in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation",
abstract = "Background: Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation face high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. In the current study, we report on uptake of cancer screening and risk-reduction options in a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers from ten countries over two time periods (1995 to 2008 and 2009 to 2017). Methods: Eligible subjects were identified from an international database of female BRCA mutation carriers and included women from 59 centres from ten countries. Subjects completed a questionnaire at the time of genetic testing, which included past use of cancer prevention options and screening tests. Biennial follow-up questionnaires were administered. Results: Six-thousand two-hundred and twenty-three women were followed for a mean of 7.5 years. The mean age at last follow-up was 52.1 years (27–96 years) and 42.3{\%} of the women had a prior diagnosis of breast cancer. In all, 27.8{\%} had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and 64.7{\%} had a BSO. Screening with breast MRI increased from 70{\%} before 2009 to 81{\%} at or after 2009. There were significant differences in uptake of all options by country. Conclusion: For women who received genetic testing more recently, uptake of prophylactic mastectomy and breast MRI is significantly higher than those who received genetic testing more than 10 years ago. However, uptake of both BSO and breast MRI is not optimal, and interventions to increase uptake are needed.",
author = "{the Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group} and Kelly Metcalfe and Andrea Eisen and Leigha Senter and Susan Armel and Louise Bordeleau and Meschino, {Wendy S.} and Tuya Pal and Lynch, {Henry T.} and Tung, {Nadine M.} and Ava Kwong and Peter Ainsworth and Beth Karlan and Pal Moller and Charis Eng and Weitzel, {Jeffrey N.} and Ping Sun and Jan Lubinski and Narod, {Steven A.}",
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AU - the Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group

AU - Metcalfe, Kelly

AU - Eisen, Andrea

AU - Senter, Leigha

AU - Armel, Susan

AU - Bordeleau, Louise

AU - Meschino, Wendy S.

AU - Pal, Tuya

AU - Lynch, Henry T.

AU - Tung, Nadine M.

AU - Kwong, Ava

AU - Ainsworth, Peter

AU - Karlan, Beth

AU - Moller, Pal

AU - Eng, Charis

AU - Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

AU - Sun, Ping

AU - Lubinski, Jan

AU - Narod, Steven A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation face high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. In the current study, we report on uptake of cancer screening and risk-reduction options in a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers from ten countries over two time periods (1995 to 2008 and 2009 to 2017). Methods: Eligible subjects were identified from an international database of female BRCA mutation carriers and included women from 59 centres from ten countries. Subjects completed a questionnaire at the time of genetic testing, which included past use of cancer prevention options and screening tests. Biennial follow-up questionnaires were administered. Results: Six-thousand two-hundred and twenty-three women were followed for a mean of 7.5 years. The mean age at last follow-up was 52.1 years (27–96 years) and 42.3% of the women had a prior diagnosis of breast cancer. In all, 27.8% had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and 64.7% had a BSO. Screening with breast MRI increased from 70% before 2009 to 81% at or after 2009. There were significant differences in uptake of all options by country. Conclusion: For women who received genetic testing more recently, uptake of prophylactic mastectomy and breast MRI is significantly higher than those who received genetic testing more than 10 years ago. However, uptake of both BSO and breast MRI is not optimal, and interventions to increase uptake are needed.

AB - Background: Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation face high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. In the current study, we report on uptake of cancer screening and risk-reduction options in a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers from ten countries over two time periods (1995 to 2008 and 2009 to 2017). Methods: Eligible subjects were identified from an international database of female BRCA mutation carriers and included women from 59 centres from ten countries. Subjects completed a questionnaire at the time of genetic testing, which included past use of cancer prevention options and screening tests. Biennial follow-up questionnaires were administered. Results: Six-thousand two-hundred and twenty-three women were followed for a mean of 7.5 years. The mean age at last follow-up was 52.1 years (27–96 years) and 42.3% of the women had a prior diagnosis of breast cancer. In all, 27.8% had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and 64.7% had a BSO. Screening with breast MRI increased from 70% before 2009 to 81% at or after 2009. There were significant differences in uptake of all options by country. Conclusion: For women who received genetic testing more recently, uptake of prophylactic mastectomy and breast MRI is significantly higher than those who received genetic testing more than 10 years ago. However, uptake of both BSO and breast MRI is not optimal, and interventions to increase uptake are needed.

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