Intestinal permeability in runners in the 1996 Chicago marathon

Rachel D. Smetanka, G. Patrick Lambert, Robert Murray, Dennis Eddy, Mary Horn, Carl V. Gisolfi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abdominal cramping, nausea, diarrhea, and GI bleeding are often reported in long-distance runners. This study set out to determine the effects of prolonged (2-4 hrs) exercise and NSAID ingestion on gastric and intestinal permeability during the first 5 hrs following the 1996 Chicago Marathon. Thirty-four healthy volunteers (20 M, 14 F; ages 30-50) completed the race and ingested the test solution (5 g sucrose, 5 g lactulose, 2 g rhamnose, in 40 ml water) within 10-15 min. The urinary excretion ratio of lactulose/rhamnose was used to assess small intestine permeability; sucrose excretion was used to evaluate gastric impairment. There were no significant differences for mean training mileage, postrace rectal temperature, and percent dehydration between runners who ingested NSAIDs and those who did not. In all, 75% of subjects reported aspirin or ibuprofen ingestion before or during the race. Runners who ingested ibuprofen had significant elevations in urinary lactulose excretion and lactulose/rhamnose ratio, whereas those who ingested aspirin or who did not ingest either NSAID had no significant differences in urinary excretion of lactulose, rhamnose, sucrose, or lactulose/rhamnose ratio compared to resting controls. Thirteen of the 26 NSAID users and 4 of the 8 non-users reported GI symptoms. It is concluded that (a) ibuprofen but not aspirin ingestion during prolonged exercise may increase gastrointestinal permeability and lead to GI symptoms, and (b) prolonged exercise alone can produce GI symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-433
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lactulose
lactulose
Rhamnose
rhamnose
Permeability
permeability
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
ibuprofen
aspirin
Ibuprofen
excretion
Aspirin
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Sucrose
exercise
Eating
ingestion
sucrose
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Intestinal permeability in runners in the 1996 Chicago marathon. / Smetanka, Rachel D.; Lambert, G. Patrick; Murray, Robert; Eddy, Dennis; Horn, Mary; Gisolfi, Carl V.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.01.1999, p. 426-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smetanka, Rachel D. ; Lambert, G. Patrick ; Murray, Robert ; Eddy, Dennis ; Horn, Mary ; Gisolfi, Carl V. / Intestinal permeability in runners in the 1996 Chicago marathon. In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition. 1999 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 426-433.
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