Intraprofessional Simulation's Impact on Advanced Practice and Baccalaureate Student Self-Efficacy

Amanda Kirkpatrick, Sarah Ball, Susan Connelly, Maribeth Hercinger, Jacquie Hanks, Meghan Potthoff, Sara Banzhaf, Kandis McCafferty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Benefits of peer learning activities among students have been well documented. According to Bandura's social cognitive theory, self-efficacy positively influences the delivery of quality nursing care. A pediatric simulation with peer learning and advanced practice nursing (APN) students was conducted to foster self-efficacy in baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) students. Method A pre–post quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the simulations' effect on student self-efficacy in a convenience sample of BSN students at a Midwest Jesuit university. Results More than 90% of BSN students agreed that they benefited from the simulation in the areas of leadership, skill development, communication, and collaboration. In addition, a statistically significant increase (p <.0001) in BSN students' reported understanding of the roles and relationships between a physician, APN-, and a BSN-prepared nurse was revealed. Conclusions Intraprofessional nursing peer learning activities can enhance students' self-efficacy. Future studies should include objective measurements of student clinical performance and intraprofessional collaboration with correlational analysis of both BSN and APN student self-efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Simulation in Nursing
Volume16
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Self-efficacy
Nursing
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Students
Advanced Practice Nursing
simulation
Nursing Students
nursing
Simulation
student
Learning
Pediatrics
Leadership
Experimental design
Quality of Health Care
Nursing Care
learning
Jesuit
Research Design

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Intraprofessional Simulation's Impact on Advanced Practice and Baccalaureate Student Self-Efficacy. / Kirkpatrick, Amanda; Ball, Sarah; Connelly, Susan; Hercinger, Maribeth; Hanks, Jacquie; Potthoff, Meghan; Banzhaf, Sara; McCafferty, Kandis.

In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, Vol. 16, 01.03.2018, p. 33-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kirkpatrick, Amanda ; Ball, Sarah ; Connelly, Susan ; Hercinger, Maribeth ; Hanks, Jacquie ; Potthoff, Meghan ; Banzhaf, Sara ; McCafferty, Kandis. / Intraprofessional Simulation's Impact on Advanced Practice and Baccalaureate Student Self-Efficacy. In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 16. pp. 33-39.
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