Latino police officers

Patterns of ethnic self-identity and Latino community attachment

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is argued that increased employment of Latino officers will enhance policing in Latino communities based on assumptions that Latino officers share a common ethnic identity and have positive attitudes toward Latino community members based on identification with the coethnic communities they police. These assumptions, however, remain largely untested. Through interviews with 100% of Latino police officers in a large midwestern city, this study investigated the officers' ethnic identification and attachment to the Latino communities they police. Contrary to public policy assumptions, although most expressed a strong Latino identity and community attachment, many did not, and a small number self-identified as exclusively "White/Anglo."

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)468-495
Number of pages28
JournalPolice Quarterly
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

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police officer
community
police
large city
ethnic identity
public policy
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

Cite this

Latino police officers : Patterns of ethnic self-identity and Latino community attachment. / Irlbeck, Dawn M.

In: Police Quarterly, Vol. 11, No. 4, 12.2008, p. 468-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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