Low plasma basic fibroblast growth factor is associated with laser photocoagulation treatment in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial

Mark B. Zimering, Robert J. Anderson, Thomas E. Moritz, Ling Ge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a potent endothelial cell mitogen that does not normally circulate. Yet plasma bFGF-like bioactivity was increased in association with persistent microalbuminuria and retinopathy in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we tested whether plasma bFGF immunoreactivity (IR) could predict the need for laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy in a baseline subset of advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (mean: age, 59 years; diabetes duration, 11 years; baseline glycosylated hemoglobin, 9.5%). Plasma bFGF-IR was determined with a sensitive and specific 2-site enzyme-linked immunoassay in 172 patients at the baseline visit. Results were dichotomized at 4.5 pg/mL, the upper limit in healthy men. There was an unexpected significant association between low baseline plasma bFGF-IR level and the interim (4 years) need for laser treatment. First laser treatment was significantly more likely to be required in patients with low compared with high baseline bFGF (19% vs 6%, P = .03 for the difference). After adjusting for clinical risk factors, low vs high bFGF (hazard ratio [HR], 5.01; P = .012), duration of diabetes (HR, 1.05; P = .050), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (HR, 0.98; P = .027) were all significantly associated with time to first laser occurrence. These and our prior results suggest that low plasma bFGF-IR may be a marker for the presence of anti-endothelial cell autoantibodies that may contribute to the need for laser photocoagulation treatment in adult men with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-400
Number of pages8
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Light Coagulation
Veterans
Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Lasers
Therapeutics
Endothelial Cells
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Diabetic Retinopathy
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Mitogens
Autoantibodies
LDL Cholesterol

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

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title = "Low plasma basic fibroblast growth factor is associated with laser photocoagulation treatment in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial",
abstract = "Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a potent endothelial cell mitogen that does not normally circulate. Yet plasma bFGF-like bioactivity was increased in association with persistent microalbuminuria and retinopathy in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we tested whether plasma bFGF immunoreactivity (IR) could predict the need for laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy in a baseline subset of advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (mean: age, 59 years; diabetes duration, 11 years; baseline glycosylated hemoglobin, 9.5{\%}). Plasma bFGF-IR was determined with a sensitive and specific 2-site enzyme-linked immunoassay in 172 patients at the baseline visit. Results were dichotomized at 4.5 pg/mL, the upper limit in healthy men. There was an unexpected significant association between low baseline plasma bFGF-IR level and the interim (4 years) need for laser treatment. First laser treatment was significantly more likely to be required in patients with low compared with high baseline bFGF (19{\%} vs 6{\%}, P = .03 for the difference). After adjusting for clinical risk factors, low vs high bFGF (hazard ratio [HR], 5.01; P = .012), duration of diabetes (HR, 1.05; P = .050), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (HR, 0.98; P = .027) were all significantly associated with time to first laser occurrence. These and our prior results suggest that low plasma bFGF-IR may be a marker for the presence of anti-endothelial cell autoantibodies that may contribute to the need for laser photocoagulation treatment in adult men with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus.",
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