Maternal obesity and the risk of infant death in the United States

Aimin Chen, Shingairai A. Feresu, Cristina F. Fernández, Walter J. Rogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Maternal obesity (defined as prepregnancy body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m) is associated with increased risk of neonatal death. Its association with infant death, postneonatal death, and cause-specific infant death is less well-characterized. METHODS: We studied the association between maternal obesity and the risk of infant death by using 1988 US National Maternal and Infant Health Survey data. A case-control analysis of 4265 infant deaths and 7293 controls was conducted using SUDAAN software. Self-reported prepregnancy BMI and weight gain were used in the primary analysis, whereas weight variables in medical records were used in a subset of 4308 women. RESULTS: Compared with normal weight women (prepregnancy BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m) who gained 0.30 to 0.44 kg/wk during pregnancy, obese women had increased risk of neonatal death and overall infant death. For obese women who had weight gain during pregnancy of

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-81
Number of pages8
JournalEpidemiology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

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Obesity
Mothers
Body Mass Index
Weight Gain
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy
Health Surveys
Medical Records
Cause of Death
Software
Infant Death
Perinatal Death

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Maternal obesity and the risk of infant death in the United States. / Chen, Aimin; Feresu, Shingairai A.; Fernández, Cristina F.; Rogan, Walter J.

In: Epidemiology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 74-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Aimin ; Feresu, Shingairai A. ; Fernández, Cristina F. ; Rogan, Walter J. / Maternal obesity and the risk of infant death in the United States. In: Epidemiology. 2009 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 74-81.
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