Medication Adherence and Its Connection With Depression and Lifestyle Medicine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Depression is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Research has shown that exercise can improve the symptoms associated with depression, in part by influencing many of the same chemicals that antidepressants do, such as serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. Medication adherence research shows that patients who are depressed are less likely than nondepressed patients to adhere to their drug therapy, even for medications that are not related to depression. It is presumable, then, that patients with depression may have difficulty adhering to their healthy lifestyle behaviors as well. The purpose of this article is to discuss medication adherence and its possible effects on the management of depression and lifestyle medicine activities as well as the role that pharmacists have in adherence to lifestyle medicine activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-415
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Medication Adherence
Life Style
Medicine
Depression
Pharmacists
Research
Antidepressive Agents
Dopamine
Serotonin
Norepinephrine
Exercise
Drug Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Medication Adherence and Its Connection With Depression and Lifestyle Medicine. / Lenz, Thomas L.

In: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 5, 2010, p. 413-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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