Messaging and Multivitamin Use

Rethinking the “It Can’t Hurt” Philosophy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Fifty-two percent of American adults report use of a dietary supplement, most commonly for improved health and disease prevention. However, literature supporting such use is inconsistent. Many providers suggest that the addition of a multivitamin “couldn’t hurt,” but this messaging may promote unintentional consequences including a shift of emphasis on intake of healthy foods to nutrient supplements and a neglected opportunity to discuss the profound benefits of a healthy diet. Potential implications of such messaging and recommendations for counseling are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Dietary Supplements
Counseling
Eating
Food
Health
Healthy Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{16dd7dbb8e0e4c8fb00fb73ac027998e,
title = "Messaging and Multivitamin Use: Rethinking the “It Can’t Hurt” Philosophy",
abstract = "Fifty-two percent of American adults report use of a dietary supplement, most commonly for improved health and disease prevention. However, literature supporting such use is inconsistent. Many providers suggest that the addition of a multivitamin “couldn’t hurt,” but this messaging may promote unintentional consequences including a shift of emphasis on intake of healthy foods to nutrient supplements and a neglected opportunity to discuss the profound benefits of a healthy diet. Potential implications of such messaging and recommendations for counseling are described.",
author = "White, {Nicole D.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1559827619826572",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine",
issn = "1559-8276",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Messaging and Multivitamin Use

T2 - Rethinking the “It Can’t Hurt” Philosophy

AU - White, Nicole D.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Fifty-two percent of American adults report use of a dietary supplement, most commonly for improved health and disease prevention. However, literature supporting such use is inconsistent. Many providers suggest that the addition of a multivitamin “couldn’t hurt,” but this messaging may promote unintentional consequences including a shift of emphasis on intake of healthy foods to nutrient supplements and a neglected opportunity to discuss the profound benefits of a healthy diet. Potential implications of such messaging and recommendations for counseling are described.

AB - Fifty-two percent of American adults report use of a dietary supplement, most commonly for improved health and disease prevention. However, literature supporting such use is inconsistent. Many providers suggest that the addition of a multivitamin “couldn’t hurt,” but this messaging may promote unintentional consequences including a shift of emphasis on intake of healthy foods to nutrient supplements and a neglected opportunity to discuss the profound benefits of a healthy diet. Potential implications of such messaging and recommendations for counseling are described.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061187846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061187846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1559827619826572

DO - 10.1177/1559827619826572

M3 - Review article

JO - American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

JF - American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

SN - 1559-8276

ER -