Methods for reproducible in vivo apparent velocity in cancellous bone

G. Brandenburger, L. Avioli, C. Chestnut, R. Heaney, S. McDougall, C. Olson, Robert R. Recker, C. Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The apparent velocity of ultrasound (AVU) yields clinically useful information about bone fragility. AVU is measured at the patella using a small, hand-held probe consisting of a pair of identical, wideband transducers affixed to a digital caliper capable of measuring the width of the bone. The apparent velocity of ultrasound transmission is determined by dividing the measured bone width by the time of flight of the transmitted ultrasound signal. The resulting measurement variability is 2%. An approach for further reducing variability using the arrival time derived from the first zero crossing (ZC), instead of the leading edge, is described. This produces a significant reduction in the variability caused by noise, dispersion of the leading edge, and multipath propagation. Results from a 2-year clinical study of 273 women show a reduction of variability from 41 M/s to 31 M/s. Theory, methods, and clinical results are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1359-1361
Number of pages3
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume3
StatePublished - 1990

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bones
Bone
Ultrasonics
leading edges
roots of equations
Multipath propagation
arrivals
Transducers
transducers
broadband
propagation
probes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Brandenburger, G., Avioli, L., Chestnut, C., Heaney, R., McDougall, S., Olson, C., ... Turner, C. (1990). Methods for reproducible in vivo apparent velocity in cancellous bone. Unknown Journal, 3, 1359-1361.

Methods for reproducible in vivo apparent velocity in cancellous bone. / Brandenburger, G.; Avioli, L.; Chestnut, C.; Heaney, R.; McDougall, S.; Olson, C.; Recker, Robert R.; Turner, C.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 3, 1990, p. 1359-1361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brandenburger, G, Avioli, L, Chestnut, C, Heaney, R, McDougall, S, Olson, C, Recker, RR & Turner, C 1990, 'Methods for reproducible in vivo apparent velocity in cancellous bone', Unknown Journal, vol. 3, pp. 1359-1361.
Brandenburger G, Avioli L, Chestnut C, Heaney R, McDougall S, Olson C et al. Methods for reproducible in vivo apparent velocity in cancellous bone. Unknown Journal. 1990;3:1359-1361.
Brandenburger, G. ; Avioli, L. ; Chestnut, C. ; Heaney, R. ; McDougall, S. ; Olson, C. ; Recker, Robert R. ; Turner, C. / Methods for reproducible in vivo apparent velocity in cancellous bone. In: Unknown Journal. 1990 ; Vol. 3. pp. 1359-1361.
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