Minimal Genetic Findings and Their Cancer Control Implications: A Family With the Cancer Family Syndrome

Henry T. Lynch, Patrick M. Lynch, Randall E. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A kindred in which five first-degree relatives were initially known to exhibit colorectal, endometrial, and unspecified carcinoma for two generations, occurring at an early age and including three cases of multiple primary cancer, is consistent with criteria for the cancer family syndrome. Follow-up included a diligent surveillance program that led to the early diagnosis of colon cancer in a young member of the third generation who had been considered at high risk for this lesion. Manifestly, hereditary cancer syndrome identification may be expedited through longitudinal study of apparently cancer-prone kindreds, given limited historical information about tumor expression. However, cancer surveillance measures can and should be instituted early and predicated on clues that suggest, but need not be diagnostic of, such a hereditary cancer predisposing disorder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-538
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume240
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 11 1978

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Neoplasms
Hereditary Neoplastic Syndromes
Endometrial Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
Colonic Neoplasms
Longitudinal Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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Minimal Genetic Findings and Their Cancer Control Implications : A Family With the Cancer Family Syndrome. / Lynch, Henry T.; Lynch, Patrick M.; Harris, Randall E.

In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 240, No. 6, 11.08.1978, p. 535-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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