Morphological correlates of emotional and cognitive behaviour: Insights from studies on inbred and outbred rodent strains and their crosses

Deniz M. Yilmazer-Hanke

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Every study in rodents is also a behavioural genetic study even if only a single strain is used. Outbred strains are genetically heterogeneous populations with a high intrastrain variation, whereas inbred strains are based on the multiplication of a unique individual. The aim of the present review is to summarize findings on brain regions involved in three major components of rodent behaviour, locomotion, anxiety-related behaviour and cognition, by paying particular attention to the genetic context, genetic models used and interstrain comparisons. Recent trends correlating gene expression in inbred strains with behavioural data in databases, morpho-behavioural-haplotype analyses and problems arising from large-scale multivariate analyses are discussed. Morpho-behavioural correlations in multiple strains are presented, including correlations with projection neurons, interneurons and fibre systems in the striatum, midbrain, amygdala, medial septum and hippocampus, by relating them to relevant transmitter systems. In addition, brain areas differentially activated in different strains are described (hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, locus ceruleus). Direct interstrain comparisons indicate that strain differences in behavioural variables and neuronal markers are much more common than usually thought. The choice of the appropriate genetic model can therefore contribute to an interpretation of positive results in a wider context, and help to avoid misleading interpretations of negative results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-434
Number of pages32
JournalBehavioural Pharmacology
Volume19
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Genetic Models
Rodentia
Hippocampus
Behavioral Genetics
Locus Coeruleus
Nucleus Accumbens
Brain
Interneurons
Locomotion
Mesencephalon
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Cognition
Haplotypes
Multivariate Analysis
Anxiety
Databases
Gene Expression
Neurons
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Morphological correlates of emotional and cognitive behaviour : Insights from studies on inbred and outbred rodent strains and their crosses. / Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz M.

In: Behavioural Pharmacology, Vol. 19, No. 5-6, 09.2008, p. 403-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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