Multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pain patients

Its efficacy in changing patient locus of control

Alicia M. Coughlin, Amy S. Badura Brack, Todd D. Fleischer, Thomas Guck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatment in altering chronic pain patient locus of control beliefs. Design: A before-and- after treatment design including demographics. Participants: Seventy-three chronic nonmalignant pain patients who completed study questionnaires both before and after treatment. Setting: Comprehensive, outpatient, multidisciplinary pain management program at a large Midwestern university medical center. Main Outcome Measures: Pain Locus of Control Scale and Survey of Pain Attitudes Control subscale. Results: Patients' perceptions of personal control over pain increased from pretreatment to posttreatment, and patients' perceptions of external control over pain, such as fate or powerful others, decreased from pretreatment to posttreatment. Conclusions: This study supports the efficacy of chronic pain management centers in altering patient beliefs about pain. The ability to increase patients' self-efficacy in their control over pain and to decrease external attributions are essential to successful pain management. (C) 2000 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)739-740
Number of pages2
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume81
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000

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Internal-External Control
Chronic Pain
Pain
Pain Management
Therapeutics
Pain Clinics
Aptitude
Self Efficacy
Outpatients
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pain patients : Its efficacy in changing patient locus of control. / Coughlin, Alicia M.; Badura Brack, Amy S.; Fleischer, Todd D.; Guck, Thomas.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 81, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 739-740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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