National status of the entry-level doctorate in occupational therapy (OTD)

Yolanda Griffiths, Rene Padilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multifaceted survey was conducted to identify the factors that academic occupational therapy (OT) programs were considering in making decisions as to whether the entry-level clinical doctorate (OTD) is a viable alternative for their institutions. The survey was sent in the summer of 2004 to program directors of all (150) occupational therapy programs in the United States. Responses were received from 111 programs (response rate of 74%). Quantitative (demographic) and qualitative (factor identification) data were compiled and analyzed. Supporting factors for the development of entry-level OTD programs included (a) coexistence of physical therapy doctorate program, (b) enhanced preparation of graduates, and (c) improved student recruitment. Impeding factors included (a) limited resources, (b) philosophical objections, and (c) lack of demand. In addition, results suggested that overall there is greater support for the OTD as a postprofessional degree. The study provided a historical record of current decision making in occupational therapy academic programs. In addition, the results of the study suggest a need for the development of national consensus regarding the place of the OTD in occupational therapy education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)540-550
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume60
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2006

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Occupational Therapy
Decision Making
Consensus
Demography
Students
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

National status of the entry-level doctorate in occupational therapy (OTD). / Griffiths, Yolanda; Padilla, Rene.

In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 60, No. 5, 09.2006, p. 540-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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