Negotiation of face between bereaved parents and their social networks

M. Chad McBride, Paige Toller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For many bereaved parents, talking about their child's death and their grief experiences is a way to cope with grief. Unfortunately, communicating with others often proves difficult for parents and their social networks, often because of face threats. The purpose of the present study is to identify how the face needs of parents and their social network is communicatively negotiated. Fifty-three bereaved parents were interviewed and the data analyzed, resulting in a theme of protection. The findings highlight ways in which both the parents' and others' positive and negative faces were co-managed. These findings highlight the complex nature of facework in social networks at individual, relational, and systemic levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-229
Number of pages20
JournalThe Southern Communication Journal
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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social network
parents
grief
threat
death
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

Negotiation of face between bereaved parents and their social networks. / McBride, M. Chad; Toller, Paige.

In: The Southern Communication Journal, Vol. 76, No. 3, 07.2011, p. 210-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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