Nitric oxide concentrations and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in an experimental animal model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

Christopher J. Destache, Catherine B. Pakiz, Alekha K. Dash, Christine Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of meningitis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in causing cerebral edema. Modulating NO production in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may have a role in the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Experimental S. pneumoniae meningitis was induced in a rabbit model to determine CSF parameters and NO concentrations. An electrochemical probe in the CSF throughout the 7-hour experiment monitored NO concentrations. The animals had S. pneumoniae (10 5) injected intracisternally and incubated for 1 hour. Cerebrospinal fluid 200-300 μl was obtained by intracisternal puncture at zero, 2, 4, and 7 hours after drug administration to measure glucose, protein, and lactic acid by standard chemical methods. White blood cell count was measured by hemocytometry. Three groups of five animals were used - control (C), ceftriaxone (CTX), and ceftriaxone plus dexamethasone (CTX+D). Ceftriaxone concentrations in CSF were obtained by microdialysis and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mean (± SEM) CSF white blood cell count was significantly higher at 2 hours in the C group than in the other two groups (C 7307 ± 1302, CTX 605 ± 345, CTX+D 730 ± 43/mm 3, p0.05), whereas they did not rise significantly until 7 hours in the CTX group (CTX 18.7 ± 0.7, C 8.9 ± 0.4 μM, p=0.055; CTX+D 8.1 ± 2.2 μM, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-619
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pneumococcal Meningitis
Ceftriaxone
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Nitric Oxide
Animal Models
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Leukocyte Count
Bacterial Meningitides
Brain Edema
Microdialysis
Meningitis
Punctures
Dexamethasone
Lactic Acid
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Rabbits
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Nitric oxide concentrations and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in an experimental animal model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. / Destache, Christopher J.; Pakiz, Catherine B.; Dash, Alekha K.; Larsen, Christine.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 18, No. 3, 05.1998, p. 612-619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{32f856623c984e1ebb9ebfe8e29028c7,
title = "Nitric oxide concentrations and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in an experimental animal model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis",
abstract = "Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of meningitis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in causing cerebral edema. Modulating NO production in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may have a role in the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Experimental S. pneumoniae meningitis was induced in a rabbit model to determine CSF parameters and NO concentrations. An electrochemical probe in the CSF throughout the 7-hour experiment monitored NO concentrations. The animals had S. pneumoniae (10 5) injected intracisternally and incubated for 1 hour. Cerebrospinal fluid 200-300 μl was obtained by intracisternal puncture at zero, 2, 4, and 7 hours after drug administration to measure glucose, protein, and lactic acid by standard chemical methods. White blood cell count was measured by hemocytometry. Three groups of five animals were used - control (C), ceftriaxone (CTX), and ceftriaxone plus dexamethasone (CTX+D). Ceftriaxone concentrations in CSF were obtained by microdialysis and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mean (± SEM) CSF white blood cell count was significantly higher at 2 hours in the C group than in the other two groups (C 7307 ± 1302, CTX 605 ± 345, CTX+D 730 ± 43/mm 3, p0.05), whereas they did not rise significantly until 7 hours in the CTX group (CTX 18.7 ± 0.7, C 8.9 ± 0.4 μM, p=0.055; CTX+D 8.1 ± 2.2 μM, p",
author = "Destache, {Christopher J.} and Pakiz, {Catherine B.} and Dash, {Alekha K.} and Christine Larsen",
year = "1998",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "612--619",
journal = "Pharmacotherapy",
issn = "0277-0008",
publisher = "Pharmacotherapy Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nitric oxide concentrations and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in an experimental animal model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

AU - Destache, Christopher J.

AU - Pakiz, Catherine B.

AU - Dash, Alekha K.

AU - Larsen, Christine

PY - 1998/5

Y1 - 1998/5

N2 - Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of meningitis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in causing cerebral edema. Modulating NO production in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may have a role in the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Experimental S. pneumoniae meningitis was induced in a rabbit model to determine CSF parameters and NO concentrations. An electrochemical probe in the CSF throughout the 7-hour experiment monitored NO concentrations. The animals had S. pneumoniae (10 5) injected intracisternally and incubated for 1 hour. Cerebrospinal fluid 200-300 μl was obtained by intracisternal puncture at zero, 2, 4, and 7 hours after drug administration to measure glucose, protein, and lactic acid by standard chemical methods. White blood cell count was measured by hemocytometry. Three groups of five animals were used - control (C), ceftriaxone (CTX), and ceftriaxone plus dexamethasone (CTX+D). Ceftriaxone concentrations in CSF were obtained by microdialysis and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mean (± SEM) CSF white blood cell count was significantly higher at 2 hours in the C group than in the other two groups (C 7307 ± 1302, CTX 605 ± 345, CTX+D 730 ± 43/mm 3, p0.05), whereas they did not rise significantly until 7 hours in the CTX group (CTX 18.7 ± 0.7, C 8.9 ± 0.4 μM, p=0.055; CTX+D 8.1 ± 2.2 μM, p

AB - Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of meningitis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in causing cerebral edema. Modulating NO production in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may have a role in the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Experimental S. pneumoniae meningitis was induced in a rabbit model to determine CSF parameters and NO concentrations. An electrochemical probe in the CSF throughout the 7-hour experiment monitored NO concentrations. The animals had S. pneumoniae (10 5) injected intracisternally and incubated for 1 hour. Cerebrospinal fluid 200-300 μl was obtained by intracisternal puncture at zero, 2, 4, and 7 hours after drug administration to measure glucose, protein, and lactic acid by standard chemical methods. White blood cell count was measured by hemocytometry. Three groups of five animals were used - control (C), ceftriaxone (CTX), and ceftriaxone plus dexamethasone (CTX+D). Ceftriaxone concentrations in CSF were obtained by microdialysis and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mean (± SEM) CSF white blood cell count was significantly higher at 2 hours in the C group than in the other two groups (C 7307 ± 1302, CTX 605 ± 345, CTX+D 730 ± 43/mm 3, p0.05), whereas they did not rise significantly until 7 hours in the CTX group (CTX 18.7 ± 0.7, C 8.9 ± 0.4 μM, p=0.055; CTX+D 8.1 ± 2.2 μM, p

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031981875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031981875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 612

EP - 619

JO - Pharmacotherapy

JF - Pharmacotherapy

SN - 0277-0008

IS - 3

ER -