Nurse satisfaction using insulin pens in hospitalized patients

Estella M. Davis, Anne Bebee, LeaAnne Crawford, Christopher J. Destache

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate nurse satisfaction using pen devices compared with vials/syringes to administer insulin to hospitalized patients with diabetes. Methods: A quasi-experimental 1-group posttest only study design was utilized to distribute a satisfaction survey to 54 registered nurses in a community hospital after implementation of insulin pen devices from July 2005 to May 2006 on 2 medical-surgical floors. Nurses completed a voluntary, anonymous, self-administered, postassessment, investigator-developed survey asking about the number of years practiced as a nurse and experience administering insulin to patients. The survey also asked about insulin administration satisfaction questions comparing insulin pen devices to vials/syringes, and estimated time to teach patients to self-inject insulin using either delivery method during the study period. Results: In comparison to vials/syringes, the majority of nurses agreed that insulin pens were more convenient, simple and easy to use, and an overall improvement compared with conventional vials/syringes. There were no insulin-related needlestick injuries using the insulin pens and safety needles. Conclusion: Nurses were satisfied with multiple aspects of insulin pens compared with vials/syringes. Implementation of insulin pen devices does not increase nursing time spent to teach patients to self-inject insulin and does not increase insulin-related needlestick injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)799-809
Number of pages11
JournalDiabetes Educator
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

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Nurses
Insulin
Syringes
Needlestick Injuries
Equipment and Supplies
Community Hospital
Needles
Nursing
Research Personnel
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Nurse satisfaction using insulin pens in hospitalized patients. / Davis, Estella M.; Bebee, Anne; Crawford, LeaAnne; Destache, Christopher J.

In: Diabetes Educator, Vol. 35, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 799-809.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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