Occurrence, transmission, and zoonotic potential of chronic wasting disease

Samuel E. Saunders, Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt, Jason C. Bartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, transmissible prion disease that affects captive and free-ranging deer, elk, and moose. Although the zoonotic potential of CWD is considered low, identification of multiple CWD strains and the potential for agent evolution upon serial passage hinders a definitive conclusion. Surveillance for CWD in free-ranging populations has documented a continual geographic spread of the disease throughout North America. CWD prions are shed from clinically and preclinically affected hosts, and CWD transmission is mediated at least in part by the environment, perhaps by soil. Much remains unknown, including the sites and mechanisms of prion uptake in the naive host. There are no therapeutics or effective eradication measures for CWD-endemic populations. Continued surveillance and research of CWD and its effects on cervid ecosystems is vital for controlling the long-term consequences of this emerging disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-376
Number of pages8
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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