Pelvic floor dysfunction in rural postpartum mothers in the United States: prevalence, severity, and psychosocial correlates

Kailey Snyder, Elizabeth Mollard, Kari Bargstadt-Wilson, Julie Peterson, Caralin Branscum, Tara Richards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is a common gynecological problem; however, women residing in rural communities may refrain from seeking treatment for PFD. The purpose of this study was to characterize severity of PFD among postpartum women residing in rural communities (<50,000 residents) in the United States and explore the demographic and psychosocial correlates of PFD. Methods: A survey packet comprised of the Pelvic Floor Disability Index (PFDI-20) and Prolapse and Incontinence Knowledge Questionnaire (PIKQ) as well as the Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Screening (EPDS), items from the Canadian Sexual Health Indicator (CSHI) survey, and demographic questions were distributed via electronic link following recruitment using social media. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the factors associated with PFDI-20 score. Results: Participants (n = 383) have limited pelvic health knowledge (PIKQ) despite self-reporting moderate symptoms of dysfunction (PFDI-20). Over half of women scored ≥14 on the EPDS, indicating probable depression. Women with high scores on the EPDS had greater odds of reporting moderate/severe PFD. Women that identified as Black and/or having a college degree were more likely to report moderate/severe PFD. Conclusion: Rural women require further support to improve their physical and psychological health in the postpartum period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)775-787
Number of pages13
JournalWomen and Health
Volume62
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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