Performance implications of a retail purchasing network: The role of social capital

Matthew T. Seevers, Steven J. Skinner, Robert Dahlstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study employs social capital theory to examine how a retail buyer's network of industry peers influences retail performance. We propose that performance is enhanced by three network resources - access, referral, and influence - that result from two structural facets of a retail buyer's network: contact diversity and contact position. We test the model by collecting sociometric data that measures interpersonal ties among 84 retail buyers operating in the same geographic territory in the U.S. golf industry. The results offer evidence that network resources lead to higher levels of performance, even when accounting for differences in human capital and organizational resources. The paper concludes with a discussion of managerial and theoretical implications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-367
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Retailing
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

Purchasing
Social capital
Retail
Buyers
Industry
Network resources
Referral
Organizational resources
Human capital
Golf
Social capital theory
Peer influence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Marketing

Cite this

Performance implications of a retail purchasing network : The role of social capital. / Seevers, Matthew T.; Skinner, Steven J.; Dahlstrom, Robert.

In: Journal of Retailing, Vol. 86, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 356-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seevers, Matthew T. ; Skinner, Steven J. ; Dahlstrom, Robert. / Performance implications of a retail purchasing network : The role of social capital. In: Journal of Retailing. 2010 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 356-367.
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