Phosphatases and kinases regulating CDC25 activity in the cell cycle

clinical implications of CDC25 overexpression and potential treatment strategies

Swastika Sur, Devendra K. Agrawal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alterations in the cell-cycle regulatory genes result in uncontrolled cell proliferation leading to several disease conditions. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their regulatory subunit, cyclins, are essential proteins in cell-cycle progression. The activity of CDK is regulated by a series of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at different amino acid residues. Cell Division Cycle-25 (CDC25) plays an important role in transitions between cell-cycle phases by dephosphorylating and activating CDKs. CDC25B and CDC25C play a major role in G2/M progression, whereas CDC25A assists in G1/S transition. Different isomers of CDC25 expressions are upregulated in various clinicopathological situations. Overexpression of CDC25A deregulates G1/S and G2/M events, including the G2 checkpoint. CDC25B has oncogenic properties. Binding to the 14-3-3 proteins regulates the activity and localization of CDC25B. CDC25C is predominantly a nuclear protein in mammalian cells. At the G2/M transition, mitotic activation of CDC25C protein occurs by its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins along with its phosphorylation at multiple sites within its N-terminal domain. In this article, we critically reviewed the biology of the activation/deactivation of CDC25 by kinases/phosphatases to maintain the level of CDK-cyclin activities and thus the genomic stability, clinical implications due to dysregulation of CDC25, and potential role of CDC25 inhibitors in diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-46
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Volume416
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Cell Cycle
Phosphotransferases
Cells
Cyclin-Dependent Kinases
14-3-3 Proteins
Phosphorylation
Cyclins
Chemical activation
Cell proliferation
cdc Genes
Cell Cycle Proteins
Nuclear Proteins
Genomic Instability
Isomers
Regulator Genes
Proteins
Genes
Amino Acids
Cell Proliferation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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title = "Phosphatases and kinases regulating CDC25 activity in the cell cycle: clinical implications of CDC25 overexpression and potential treatment strategies",
abstract = "Alterations in the cell-cycle regulatory genes result in uncontrolled cell proliferation leading to several disease conditions. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their regulatory subunit, cyclins, are essential proteins in cell-cycle progression. The activity of CDK is regulated by a series of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at different amino acid residues. Cell Division Cycle-25 (CDC25) plays an important role in transitions between cell-cycle phases by dephosphorylating and activating CDKs. CDC25B and CDC25C play a major role in G2/M progression, whereas CDC25A assists in G1/S transition. Different isomers of CDC25 expressions are upregulated in various clinicopathological situations. Overexpression of CDC25A deregulates G1/S and G2/M events, including the G2 checkpoint. CDC25B has oncogenic properties. Binding to the 14-3-3 proteins regulates the activity and localization of CDC25B. CDC25C is predominantly a nuclear protein in mammalian cells. At the G2/M transition, mitotic activation of CDC25C protein occurs by its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins along with its phosphorylation at multiple sites within its N-terminal domain. In this article, we critically reviewed the biology of the activation/deactivation of CDC25 by kinases/phosphatases to maintain the level of CDK-cyclin activities and thus the genomic stability, clinical implications due to dysregulation of CDC25, and potential role of CDC25 inhibitors in diseases.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Phosphatases and kinases regulating CDC25 activity in the cell cycle

T2 - clinical implications of CDC25 overexpression and potential treatment strategies

AU - Sur, Swastika

AU - Agrawal, Devendra K.

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Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - Alterations in the cell-cycle regulatory genes result in uncontrolled cell proliferation leading to several disease conditions. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their regulatory subunit, cyclins, are essential proteins in cell-cycle progression. The activity of CDK is regulated by a series of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at different amino acid residues. Cell Division Cycle-25 (CDC25) plays an important role in transitions between cell-cycle phases by dephosphorylating and activating CDKs. CDC25B and CDC25C play a major role in G2/M progression, whereas CDC25A assists in G1/S transition. Different isomers of CDC25 expressions are upregulated in various clinicopathological situations. Overexpression of CDC25A deregulates G1/S and G2/M events, including the G2 checkpoint. CDC25B has oncogenic properties. Binding to the 14-3-3 proteins regulates the activity and localization of CDC25B. CDC25C is predominantly a nuclear protein in mammalian cells. At the G2/M transition, mitotic activation of CDC25C protein occurs by its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins along with its phosphorylation at multiple sites within its N-terminal domain. In this article, we critically reviewed the biology of the activation/deactivation of CDC25 by kinases/phosphatases to maintain the level of CDK-cyclin activities and thus the genomic stability, clinical implications due to dysregulation of CDC25, and potential role of CDC25 inhibitors in diseases.

AB - Alterations in the cell-cycle regulatory genes result in uncontrolled cell proliferation leading to several disease conditions. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their regulatory subunit, cyclins, are essential proteins in cell-cycle progression. The activity of CDK is regulated by a series of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at different amino acid residues. Cell Division Cycle-25 (CDC25) plays an important role in transitions between cell-cycle phases by dephosphorylating and activating CDKs. CDC25B and CDC25C play a major role in G2/M progression, whereas CDC25A assists in G1/S transition. Different isomers of CDC25 expressions are upregulated in various clinicopathological situations. Overexpression of CDC25A deregulates G1/S and G2/M events, including the G2 checkpoint. CDC25B has oncogenic properties. Binding to the 14-3-3 proteins regulates the activity and localization of CDC25B. CDC25C is predominantly a nuclear protein in mammalian cells. At the G2/M transition, mitotic activation of CDC25C protein occurs by its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins along with its phosphorylation at multiple sites within its N-terminal domain. In this article, we critically reviewed the biology of the activation/deactivation of CDC25 by kinases/phosphatases to maintain the level of CDK-cyclin activities and thus the genomic stability, clinical implications due to dysregulation of CDC25, and potential role of CDC25 inhibitors in diseases.

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