Placebo Treatment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The effectiveness of many medical interventions hinges in part on the 'placebo effect,' a person's self-healing power that is stimulated by his or her belief in medical treatments. Health professionals can incite that same effect by giving the patient a chemically inactive pill without revealing its true nature. This strategy is ethically problematic because it conflicts with the patient's right to autonomy. However, the alternative - prescribing a 'real' drug - entails harms too, such as unpleasant or dangerous side effects, and more encompassing problems such as microbial drug resistance. This article examines whether placebo treatment is a form of patient deception and, if so, in what circumstances - if ever - such deceit can be justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Applied Ethics
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages453-460
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9780123739322
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

drug
patient's rights
physician's care
health professionals
autonomy
human being

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Welie, J. V. M. (2012). Placebo Treatment. In Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics (pp. 453-460). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-373932-2.00161-7

Placebo Treatment. / Welie, J. V.M.

Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. Elsevier Inc., 2012. p. 453-460.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Welie, JVM 2012, Placebo Treatment. in Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. Elsevier Inc., pp. 453-460. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-373932-2.00161-7
Welie JVM. Placebo Treatment. In Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. Elsevier Inc. 2012. p. 453-460 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-373932-2.00161-7
Welie, J. V.M. / Placebo Treatment. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. Elsevier Inc., 2012. pp. 453-460
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