Plasma Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Familial Breast Cancer

N. F. Boyd, P. Connelly, Henry T. Lynch, M. Knaus, S. Michal, M. Fili, L. J. Martin, G. Lockwood, D. Tritchler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have examined the relationship between plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and a family history of breast cancer. We measured the plasma lipids and lipoproteins in unaffected female members of the nuclear family of women with familial breast cancer and compared them with those of the female members of the nuclear family of women with sporadic breast cancer. A mean number of 3.3 relatives of mean age 35 years were studied in 23 pairs of familial and sporadic breast cancer families. After adjustment in multivariate analysis for variables that either differed between high and low risk families, or were significantly associated with plasma levels or lipoproteins, statistically significant differences were found in plasma levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apoprotein B, all of which were lower in familial breast cancer than in sporadic breast cancer families. These data suggest that inherited factors associated with breast cancer risk may play a role in determining plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels and that lipid regulatory genes should be considered in this context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 1995

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Lipoproteins
Lipids
Breast Neoplasms
Nuclear Family
Social Adjustment
Apolipoproteins B
Regulator Genes
LDL Cholesterol
Multivariate Analysis
Cholesterol
Familial Breast Cancer

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Boyd, N. F., Connelly, P., Lynch, H. T., Knaus, M., Michal, S., Fili, M., ... Tritchler, D. (1995). Plasma Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Familial Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 4(2), 117-122.

Plasma Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Familial Breast Cancer. / Boyd, N. F.; Connelly, P.; Lynch, Henry T.; Knaus, M.; Michal, S.; Fili, M.; Martin, L. J.; Lockwood, G.; Tritchler, D.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.03.1995, p. 117-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boyd, NF, Connelly, P, Lynch, HT, Knaus, M, Michal, S, Fili, M, Martin, LJ, Lockwood, G & Tritchler, D 1995, 'Plasma Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Familial Breast Cancer', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 117-122.
Boyd NF, Connelly P, Lynch HT, Knaus M, Michal S, Fili M et al. Plasma Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Familial Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 1995 Mar 1;4(2):117-122.
Boyd, N. F. ; Connelly, P. ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Knaus, M. ; Michal, S. ; Fili, M. ; Martin, L. J. ; Lockwood, G. ; Tritchler, D. / Plasma Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Familial Breast Cancer. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 1995 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 117-122.
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