Polymicrobial wound infection and nerve injury secondary to a nonhuman primate bite

Meera Varman, José R. Romero, Robert A. Cusick, Paul W. Esposito, Douglas Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nonhuman primate bites in the United States are rare. Most physicians have no experience managing them. The lesions are initially treated in much the same way as human bites, although consultation with an infectious diseases specialist, surgeon, and veterinarian are recommended, especially for microbial infection control and management. Of particular concern is animal-to-human transmission of herpes B virus, which can be fatal. We report a case of polymicrobial simian bite wound infection with associated nerve injury in a 12-year-old boy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-122
Number of pages3
JournalInfections in Medicine
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2008

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Wound Infection
Bites and Stings
Coinfection
Primates
Human Bites
Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1
Veterinarians
Wounds and Injuries
Infection Control
Communicable Diseases
Referral and Consultation
Physicians
Surgeons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Varman, M., Romero, J. R., Cusick, R. A., Esposito, P. W., & Armstrong, D. (2008). Polymicrobial wound infection and nerve injury secondary to a nonhuman primate bite. Infections in Medicine, 25(3), 120-122.

Polymicrobial wound infection and nerve injury secondary to a nonhuman primate bite. / Varman, Meera; Romero, José R.; Cusick, Robert A.; Esposito, Paul W.; Armstrong, Douglas.

In: Infections in Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 120-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Varman, M, Romero, JR, Cusick, RA, Esposito, PW & Armstrong, D 2008, 'Polymicrobial wound infection and nerve injury secondary to a nonhuman primate bite', Infections in Medicine, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 120-122.
Varman M, Romero JR, Cusick RA, Esposito PW, Armstrong D. Polymicrobial wound infection and nerve injury secondary to a nonhuman primate bite. Infections in Medicine. 2008 Mar;25(3):120-122.
Varman, Meera ; Romero, José R. ; Cusick, Robert A. ; Esposito, Paul W. ; Armstrong, Douglas. / Polymicrobial wound infection and nerve injury secondary to a nonhuman primate bite. In: Infections in Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 120-122.
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