Post pressure hyperemia in the rat

C. L. Capp, W. C. Dorwart, N. T. Elias, S. R. Hillman, S. S. Lancaster, R. C. Nair, B. T. Ngo, M. S. Rendell, D. M. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In prior studies in man, we have demonstrated that pressure-induced hyperemia lasts for prolonged periods as compared to the short-term hyperemia created by proximal arterial occlusion. We have analyzed this phenomenon in our well-studied rat model of skin blood flow. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler techniques in Wistar Kyoto rats at the back, a nutritively perfused site, and at the plantar surface of the paw, where arteriovenous anastomotic perfusion dominates. A customized pressure feedback control device was used to vary applied pressures. At the back, pressures in excess of 80 mmHg resulted in occlusion, whereas at the paw 150 mmHg was required. The peak hyperemic flow after release of pressure was comparable to that elicited by proximal arterial occlusion with a blood pressure cuff. However, the post pressure hyperemia peak descended to a plateau value, which was 50-100% greater than baseline and continued for up to 20 min while the peak following proximal arterial occlusion returned to baseline within 4 min. At the back, post pressure hyperemia reached a maximum after application of 100 mmHg pressure. The application of higher pressures than required for occlusion produced no greater hyperemic response. At the paw, maximum post pressure hyperemia occurred at 100 mmHg, although this pressure level was not totally occlusive. Higher pressures resulted in no greater hyperemia. At the back, 10 min of occlusion produced a maximal peak value whereas 1 min was sufficient at the paw. The application of pressure to a heated probe with subsequent release, produced a hyperemic response. Normalized to baseline blood flow, there was no difference between the hyperemic responses at basal skin temperature and at 44°C. There is a prolonged hyperemic response following local pressure occlusion compared to a much shorter period following proximal ischemic occlusion. One can presume two different mechanisms, one related to ischemia and the other a separate pressure related phenomenon. The thermal vasodilatory response is additive, not synergistic with the post pressure hyperemia we have demonstrated. This finding suggests that different mechanisms are involved in thermal vasodilation and post pressure hyperemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-546
Number of pages14
JournalComparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology
Volume137
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

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Hyperemia
Rats
Skin
Blood
Pressure
Pressure control
Blood pressure
Feedback control
Lasers
Temperature
Hot Temperature
Skin Temperature
Inbred WKY Rats
Vasodilation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Capp, C. L., Dorwart, W. C., Elias, N. T., Hillman, S. R., Lancaster, S. S., Nair, R. C., ... Smith, D. M. (2004). Post pressure hyperemia in the rat. Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology, 137(3), 533-546. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2003.11.010

Post pressure hyperemia in the rat. / Capp, C. L.; Dorwart, W. C.; Elias, N. T.; Hillman, S. R.; Lancaster, S. S.; Nair, R. C.; Ngo, B. T.; Rendell, M. S.; Smith, D. M.

In: Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology, Vol. 137, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 533-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Capp, CL, Dorwart, WC, Elias, NT, Hillman, SR, Lancaster, SS, Nair, RC, Ngo, BT, Rendell, MS & Smith, DM 2004, 'Post pressure hyperemia in the rat', Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology, vol. 137, no. 3, pp. 533-546. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2003.11.010
Capp, C. L. ; Dorwart, W. C. ; Elias, N. T. ; Hillman, S. R. ; Lancaster, S. S. ; Nair, R. C. ; Ngo, B. T. ; Rendell, M. S. ; Smith, D. M. / Post pressure hyperemia in the rat. In: Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology. 2004 ; Vol. 137, No. 3. pp. 533-546.
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