Prenatal counseling for pregnant somen: A survey of general dentists

Fouad Salama, Amy Kebriaei, Kimberly K. McFarland, Timothy Durham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To assess the attitudes, behavior, and demographics of general dentists in the state of Nebraska with regard to overall prenatal oral health counseling for pregnant women. Study Design: The survey asked for demographic information, number of years practicing dentistry, and patient base. The survey also asked questions about prenatal oral health counseling for pregnant women. A self-addressed stamped envelope was enclosed for dentists' returned responses. Results: Out of the 800 surveys sent, 371(46.4%) were returned. Nearly 50% of general dentists in Nebraska who responded to the survey do not provide any prenatal counseling (45.6%) and 5.9% provide prenatal counseling only once a year. There were no correlations between providing prenatal counseling and age of general dentists, gender of general dentists, type of practice, and length of time in practice or additional training completed. When asked why they do not provide prenatal counseling, 19.7% say that it is not a priority for the office and 9.5% do not provide prenatal counseling because they are not reimbursed by a third party payer. Conclusions: Fifty percent of general practitioners do provide prenatal counseling. The most common reason for not providing prenatal counseling was it is not a priority for the office and the parents are not interested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-296
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
Volume34
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dentists
Counseling
Oral Health
Pregnant Women
Demography
Health Insurance Reimbursement
Surveys and Questionnaires
Dentistry
General Practice
General Practitioners
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prenatal counseling for pregnant somen : A survey of general dentists. / Salama, Fouad; Kebriaei, Amy; McFarland, Kimberly K.; Durham, Timothy.

In: Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.07.2010, p. 291-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salama, Fouad ; Kebriaei, Amy ; McFarland, Kimberly K. ; Durham, Timothy. / Prenatal counseling for pregnant somen : A survey of general dentists. In: Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. 2010 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 291-296.
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