Prion protein adsorption to soil in a competitive matrix is slow and reduced

Samuel E. Saunders, Jason C. Bartz, Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is likely that the soil environment serves as a stable reservoir of infectious CWD and scrapie prions as well as a potential reservoir of BSE. Prion adsorption to soil could play an important role in prion mobility, proteolysis, and infectivity. We modified previously published methods to quantify adsorbed prions via direct detection and studied prion adsorption to soil and soil minerals as a function of time through 60 days. Prion-infected brain homogenate was used as a complex, relevant prion source. We determined that maximum PrP adsorption requires days or weeks, depending on the soil or mineral, and is 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than previous studies using purified PrPSc or recPrP. Because PrP adsorption to soil is slow and reduced in tissue homogenate, the possibility of prion transport in soil environments cannot be excluded and requires further investigation. Our results indicate that binding to soil may protect prions from degradation, consistent with prions' longevity in the environment. Adsorption of PrP to sterilized soil did not differ significantly from adsorption to unsterilized soil, which suggests that active biological processes do not significantly affect prion adsorption or degradation in the soil environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7728-7733
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume43
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2009

Fingerprint

Prions
adsorption
Soils
Adsorption
matrix
protein
soil
Minerals
scrapie
Proteolysis
bovine spongiform encephalopathy
Degradation
degradation
infectivity
mineral
biological processes
brain
Brain
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Prion protein adsorption to soil in a competitive matrix is slow and reduced. / Saunders, Samuel E.; Bartz, Jason C.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 43, No. 20, 15.10.2009, p. 7728-7733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saunders, Samuel E. ; Bartz, Jason C. ; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L. / Prion protein adsorption to soil in a competitive matrix is slow and reduced. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2009 ; Vol. 43, No. 20. pp. 7728-7733.
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