Pumping it up

New advancements in insulin delivery

Haley Kessinger, Emily Knezevich, Edward M. DeSimone, Michael H. Davidian

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) devices, commonly referred to as insulin pumps, are a growing trend in diabetes care. Insulin pumps enable patients to program basal delivery of insulin per hour, as well as deliver boluses for food intake throughout the day. Benefits include better diabetes control, increased flexibility of basal delivery, precise bolus dosing, and improved quality of life. Limitations may include cost, insurance coverage, and fear of dependence; CSII has also been associated with infusion-site reactions, diabetic ketoacidosis, and retinopathy. A variety of pumps with features such as alarms, reminders, and Bluetooth connectivity are available. Pharmacists can play an important role in providing pump education and training for patients, as well as troubleshooting and pump management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Volume42
No11
Specialist publicationU.S. Pharmacist
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Pumps
Insulin
Subcutaneous Infusions
Medical problems
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Insurance Coverage
Bluetooth
Insurance
Diabetic Retinopathy
Patient Education
Pharmacists
Fear
Eating
Education
Quality of Life
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Pumping it up : New advancements in insulin delivery. / Kessinger, Haley; Knezevich, Emily; DeSimone, Edward M.; Davidian, Michael H.

In: U.S. Pharmacist, Vol. 42, No. 11, 01.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Kessinger, Haley ; Knezevich, Emily ; DeSimone, Edward M. ; Davidian, Michael H. / Pumping it up : New advancements in insulin delivery. In: U.S. Pharmacist. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 11.
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