Reducing Inflammation

Statins or Lifestyle?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

An elevated C-reactive protein level is an inflammatory marker associated with an increased risk in cardiovascular disease. Regular long-term exercise, a cholesterol-lowering diet (a diet low in saturated fat and high in viscous fiber and plant sterols), and statin pharmacotherapy have all been shown to reduce C-reactive protein levels. The purpose of this article is to describe the research available regarding lowering of C-reactive protein levels and reducing incidence of cardiovascular disease. Specifically, the article will compare the use of statin therapy, regular physical activity, and a cholesterol-lowering diet. The effectiveness of each intervention will be evaluated along with the risks and benefits associated with treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-23
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
C-Reactive Protein
Life Style
Diet
Inflammation
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Phytosterols
Fats
Drug Therapy
Incidence
Therapeutics
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Reducing Inflammation : Statins or Lifestyle? / White, Nicole D.; Lenz, Thomas L.

In: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2012, p. 21-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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