Reflections on the Pharmacist-Patient Covenant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The first tenet of the Code of Ethics for Pharmacists of the American Pharmacists Association describes the relationship between the pharmacist and the patient as a covenant. The central argument of this commentary is that the symbolic language of covenant, the metaphor used to describe the pharmacist-patient relationship, should be formally acknowledged as an ideal theory or concept. However, before committing to this ideal, there should be resonance with the realities of pharmacy practice. This commentary argues that the intimate nature of a covenantal relationship is not a good fit with most contexts in which pharmacists practice. The disconnection between the ideal of the covenantal relationship and context is important because codes of ethics apply regardless of context. By acknowledging the ideal of a covenantal relationship, transitional structures could then be developed to move the pharmacy profession toward this ideal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume82
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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pharmacist
Pharmacists
Codes of Ethics
moral philosophy
Metaphor
metaphor
Language
profession
language

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Reflections on the Pharmacist-Patient Covenant. / Haddad, Amy M.

In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 82, No. 7, 01.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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