Relationship of obesity with osteoporosis

Lan Juan Zhao, Yong Jun Liu, Peng Yuan Liu, James Hamilton, Robert R. Recker, Hong Wen Deng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

341 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: The relationship between obesity and osteoporosis has been widely studied, and epidemiological evidence shows that obesity is correlated with increased bone mass. Previous analyses, however, did not control for the mechanical loading effects of total body weight on bone mass and may have generated a confounded or even biased relationship between obesity and osteoporosis. Objective: The objective of this study was to reevaluate the relationship between obesity and osteoporosis by accounting for the mechanical loading effects of total body weight on bone mass. Methods: We measured whole body fat mass, lean mass, percentage fat mass, body mass index, and bone mass in two large samples of different ethnicity: 1988 unrelated Chinese subjects and 4489 Caucasian subjects from 512 pedigrees. We first evaluated the Pearson correlations among different phenotypes. We then dissected the phenotypic correlations into genetic and environmental components with bone mass unadjusted or adjusted for body weight. This allowed us to compare the results with and without controlling for mechanical loading effects of body weight on bone mass. Results: In both Chinese and Caucasian subjects, when the mechanical loading effect of body weight on bone mass was adjusted for, the phenotypic correlation (including its genetic and environmental components) between fat mass (or percentage fat mass) and bone mass was negative. Further multivariate analyses in subjects stratified by body weight confirmed the inverse relationship between bone mass and fat mass, after mechanical loading effects due to total body weight were controlled. Conclusions: Increasing fat mass may not have a beneficial effect on bone mass.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1640-1646
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

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Osteoporosis
Bone
Obesity
Bone and Bones
Body Weight
Fats
Pedigree
Adipose Tissue
Body Mass Index
Multivariate Analysis
Phenotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Zhao, L. J., Liu, Y. J., Liu, P. Y., Hamilton, J., Recker, R. R., & Deng, H. W. (2007). Relationship of obesity with osteoporosis. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 92(5), 1640-1646. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2006-0572

Relationship of obesity with osteoporosis. / Zhao, Lan Juan; Liu, Yong Jun; Liu, Peng Yuan; Hamilton, James; Recker, Robert R.; Deng, Hong Wen.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 92, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 1640-1646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhao, LJ, Liu, YJ, Liu, PY, Hamilton, J, Recker, RR & Deng, HW 2007, 'Relationship of obesity with osteoporosis', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 92, no. 5, pp. 1640-1646. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2006-0572
Zhao, Lan Juan ; Liu, Yong Jun ; Liu, Peng Yuan ; Hamilton, James ; Recker, Robert R. ; Deng, Hong Wen. / Relationship of obesity with osteoporosis. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2007 ; Vol. 92, No. 5. pp. 1640-1646.
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