Risk Landscape of Autonomous Cars

Vasant Raval, Michael J. Dentlinger

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

This article presents a study of how automobile risks are changing over time as the level of automation shifts from the traditional to semi-autonomous to fully autonomous car. The study involves the concept of comparative advantage between the human driver and the driverless car to determine how the roles between the two have been changing and, in turn, how the change affects attendant risks. To develop a risk landscape across changes in levels of automation, the roles of human driver and driverless car are matched with the five levels of automation used to describe the phases of development of the driverless car. We conclude that the costs associated with fatal accidents will decrease sharply over time as the driverless cars are deployed on the road. And we offer implications for policy, regulation, and insurance based on our analysis of the changing risk landscape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1-18
Number of pages18
Volume56
No3
Specialist publicationEDPACS
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2017

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Railroad cars
automation
Automation
driver
insurance
motor vehicle
Insurance
accident
Automobiles
road
Accidents
regulation
costs
Costs
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Safety Research
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Risk Landscape of Autonomous Cars. / Raval, Vasant; Dentlinger, Michael J.

In: EDPACS, Vol. 56, No. 3, 02.09.2017, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Raval, Vasant ; Dentlinger, Michael J. / Risk Landscape of Autonomous Cars. In: EDPACS. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 1-18.
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