Risk of tooth loss after cigarette smoking cessation

Elizabeth A. Krall, Thomas Dietrich, Martha E. Nunn, Raul I. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Little is known about the effect of cigarette smoking cessation on risk of tooth loss. We examined how risk of tooth loss changed with longer periods of smoking abstinence in a prospective study of oral health in men. Methods Research subjects were 789 men who participated in the Veterans Administration Dental Longitudinal Study from 1968 to 2004. Tooth status and smoking status were determined at examinations performed every 3 years, for a maximum follow-up time of 35 years. Risk of tooth loss subsequent to smoking cessation was assessed sequentially at 1-year intervals with multivariate proportional hazards regression models. Men who never smoked cigarettes, cigars, or pipes formed the reference group. Hazard ratios were adjusted for age, education, total pack-years of cigarette exposure, frequency of brushing, and use of floss. Results The hazard ratio for tooth loss was 2.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-3.1) among men who smoked cigarettes during all or part of follow-up. Risk of tooth loss among men who quit smoking declined as time after smoking cessation increased, from 2.0 (95% CI, 1.4-2.9) after 1 year of abstinence to 1.0 (95% CI, 0.5-2.2) after 15 years of abstinence. The risk remained significantly elevated for the first 9 years of abstinence but eventually dropped to the level of men who never smoked after 13 or more years. Conclusion These results indicate that smoking cessation is beneficial for tooth retention, but long-term abstinence is required to reduce the risk to the level of people who have never smoked.

Original languageEnglish
Article number243
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume3
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tooth Loss
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
Tobacco Products
Tooth
Confidence Intervals
Research Subjects
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Oral Health
Proportional Hazards Models
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Krall, E. A., Dietrich, T., Nunn, M. E., & Garcia, R. I. (2006). Risk of tooth loss after cigarette smoking cessation. Preventing chronic disease, 3(4), [243].

Risk of tooth loss after cigarette smoking cessation. / Krall, Elizabeth A.; Dietrich, Thomas; Nunn, Martha E.; Garcia, Raul I.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 3, No. 4, 243, 2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krall, EA, Dietrich, T, Nunn, ME & Garcia, RI 2006, 'Risk of tooth loss after cigarette smoking cessation', Preventing chronic disease, vol. 3, no. 4, 243.
Krall, Elizabeth A. ; Dietrich, Thomas ; Nunn, Martha E. ; Garcia, Raul I. / Risk of tooth loss after cigarette smoking cessation. In: Preventing chronic disease. 2006 ; Vol. 3, No. 4.
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