Rousseau and the education of compassion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper I examine Rousseau's strategy for teaching compassion in Book Four of Emile. In particular, I look at the three maxims on compassion that help to organise Rousseau's discussion, and the precise strategy that Emile's tutor uses to instil compassion while avoiding other passions, such as anger, fear and pride. The very idea of an education in compassion is an important one: Rousseau's discussion remains relevant, and he has correctly understood the significance of compassion for modern life. But in linking compassion to self-interest, he creates a tension between Emile's natural sentiments, including compassion, as a way of bringing him into the social order. The Buddhist and Christian views of compassion help to clarify some of the difficulties with Rousseau's account.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-48
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Philosophy of Education
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

social order
anger
tutor
education
anxiety
Teaching
Education
Compassion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • History

Cite this

Rousseau and the education of compassion. / White, Richard J.

In: Journal of Philosophy of Education, Vol. 42, No. 1, 02.2008, p. 35-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e3db7477b91c48c5a0f6e6e5e8aa6628,
title = "Rousseau and the education of compassion",
abstract = "In this paper I examine Rousseau's strategy for teaching compassion in Book Four of Emile. In particular, I look at the three maxims on compassion that help to organise Rousseau's discussion, and the precise strategy that Emile's tutor uses to instil compassion while avoiding other passions, such as anger, fear and pride. The very idea of an education in compassion is an important one: Rousseau's discussion remains relevant, and he has correctly understood the significance of compassion for modern life. But in linking compassion to self-interest, he creates a tension between Emile's natural sentiments, including compassion, as a way of bringing him into the social order. The Buddhist and Christian views of compassion help to clarify some of the difficulties with Rousseau's account.",
author = "White, {Richard J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9752.2008.00613.x",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "35--48",
journal = "Journal of Philosophy of Education",
issn = "0309-8249",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rousseau and the education of compassion

AU - White, Richard J.

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - In this paper I examine Rousseau's strategy for teaching compassion in Book Four of Emile. In particular, I look at the three maxims on compassion that help to organise Rousseau's discussion, and the precise strategy that Emile's tutor uses to instil compassion while avoiding other passions, such as anger, fear and pride. The very idea of an education in compassion is an important one: Rousseau's discussion remains relevant, and he has correctly understood the significance of compassion for modern life. But in linking compassion to self-interest, he creates a tension between Emile's natural sentiments, including compassion, as a way of bringing him into the social order. The Buddhist and Christian views of compassion help to clarify some of the difficulties with Rousseau's account.

AB - In this paper I examine Rousseau's strategy for teaching compassion in Book Four of Emile. In particular, I look at the three maxims on compassion that help to organise Rousseau's discussion, and the precise strategy that Emile's tutor uses to instil compassion while avoiding other passions, such as anger, fear and pride. The very idea of an education in compassion is an important one: Rousseau's discussion remains relevant, and he has correctly understood the significance of compassion for modern life. But in linking compassion to self-interest, he creates a tension between Emile's natural sentiments, including compassion, as a way of bringing him into the social order. The Buddhist and Christian views of compassion help to clarify some of the difficulties with Rousseau's account.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=47249155712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=47249155712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9752.2008.00613.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9752.2008.00613.x

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 35

EP - 48

JO - Journal of Philosophy of Education

JF - Journal of Philosophy of Education

SN - 0309-8249

IS - 1

ER -