Self-Monitoring and Other Non-Indicators of Developing a Work–Spouse Relationship: Implications for Affective Organizational Commitment

Allison R. Thorson, M. Chad McBride

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite being a distinctive workplace relationship, little research has focused on whether or not certain employees are more prone to forming a work–spouse relationship and the organizational outcomes associated with them. Guided by theorizing on self-monitoring and affective organizational commitment, we analyzed data from 439 employees—167 (38.0%) who currently have, 111 (25.3%) who previously had, and 161 (36.7%) who have never had a work spouse—to examine the influence of self-monitoring on an employee’s propensity to develop a work–spouse relationship and explore the association between having a work spouse and affective organizational commitment. Our findings indicated that the development of a work–spouse relationship was independent of employees’ (a) sexuality, (b) romantic relationship status, and (c) nationality. With regard to self-monitoring, while our initial findings indicated that higher self-monitors were more likely to report having never formed a work–spouse relationship, this relationship was no longer significant when controlling for gender. Last, individuals currently in a work–spouse relationship reported greater affective organizational commitment than individuals who were not. Overall, the findings from this study provide a foundation for future research on the work–spouse relationship and have implications for managers as they try to better understand this unique relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Business Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

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