Significant sex differences in the correlation of electrocardiographic exercise testing and coronary arteriograms

Michael H. Sketch, Syed M. Mohiuddin, Joseph D. Lynch, Allen E. Zencka, Vincent Runco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Two hundred fifty-one patients (195 male and 56 female) referred for evaluation of chest pain were studied by multistage submaximal stress testing and selective coronary arterlography. In men with positive exercise tests the incidence rate of true positive exercise test results-that is, positive tests associated with 75 percent or greater coronary stenosis-was 89 percent in contrast to a 33 percent Incidence rate of true positive exercise test results in women. The incidence rate of false positive excercise test results-that is, positive tests associated with no coronary stenosis or less than 50 percent stenosls-was 8 percent in men in contrast to 67 percent in women. Conversely, the Incidence rate of false negative exercise test results (that is, negative exercise tests associated with 75 percent or greater coronary stenosis) was higher in men (37 percent) than in women (12 percent). It is concluded that in men a positive multistage stress test is useful in predicting the presence of significant coronary artery disease although a negative stress test cannot be relied upon to rule out the presence of significant disease. In women, a positive exercise test is of little value in predicting the presence of significant coronary artery disease, whereas a negative test is quite useful in ruling out the presence of significant disease. New criteria should be developed for stress testing of women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-173
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1975

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Exercise Test
Sex Characteristics
Exercise
Coronary Stenosis
Incidence
Coronary Artery Disease
Chest Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Significant sex differences in the correlation of electrocardiographic exercise testing and coronary arteriograms. / Sketch, Michael H.; Mohiuddin, Syed M.; Lynch, Joseph D.; Zencka, Allen E.; Runco, Vincent.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 36, No. 2, 1975, p. 169-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sketch, Michael H. ; Mohiuddin, Syed M. ; Lynch, Joseph D. ; Zencka, Allen E. ; Runco, Vincent. / Significant sex differences in the correlation of electrocardiographic exercise testing and coronary arteriograms. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 1975 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 169-173.
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