Spontaneous erosion of a lost intra-abdominal gallstone through the back eight months following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

M. A. Memon, H. J. Jenkins, Robert Joseph Fitzgibbons

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12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Gallbladder perforation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy with spillage of bile and gallstones occurs in up to 40% of patients. Several reports have recently been published describing complications related to these lost gallstones. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of this complication in our patients. METHODS: A prospectively maintained database of 856 laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed between 1989 and 1996 by a single surgeon was analyzed. RESULTS: The number of perforations resulting in loss of stones in the abdominal cavity was 16% (165 patients). Of these 165 patients, only a single patient could be identified as having a long-term complication. CONCLUSIONS: Intra-abdominal lost gallstones can produce complications secondary to migration and erosion. It is prudent to make a concerted effort to remove spilled gallstones by every possible means but conversion to laparotomy is not justifiable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-157
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Volume1
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Gallstones
Abdominal Cavity
Gallbladder
Bile
Laparotomy
Databases
Incidence

Cite this

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title = "Spontaneous erosion of a lost intra-abdominal gallstone through the back eight months following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Gallbladder perforation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy with spillage of bile and gallstones occurs in up to 40{\%} of patients. Several reports have recently been published describing complications related to these lost gallstones. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of this complication in our patients. METHODS: A prospectively maintained database of 856 laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed between 1989 and 1996 by a single surgeon was analyzed. RESULTS: The number of perforations resulting in loss of stones in the abdominal cavity was 16{\%} (165 patients). Of these 165 patients, only a single patient could be identified as having a long-term complication. CONCLUSIONS: Intra-abdominal lost gallstones can produce complications secondary to migration and erosion. It is prudent to make a concerted effort to remove spilled gallstones by every possible means but conversion to laparotomy is not justifiable.",
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T1 - Spontaneous erosion of a lost intra-abdominal gallstone through the back eight months following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

AU - Memon, M. A.

AU - Jenkins, H. J.

AU - Fitzgibbons, Robert Joseph

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Gallbladder perforation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy with spillage of bile and gallstones occurs in up to 40% of patients. Several reports have recently been published describing complications related to these lost gallstones. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of this complication in our patients. METHODS: A prospectively maintained database of 856 laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed between 1989 and 1996 by a single surgeon was analyzed. RESULTS: The number of perforations resulting in loss of stones in the abdominal cavity was 16% (165 patients). Of these 165 patients, only a single patient could be identified as having a long-term complication. CONCLUSIONS: Intra-abdominal lost gallstones can produce complications secondary to migration and erosion. It is prudent to make a concerted effort to remove spilled gallstones by every possible means but conversion to laparotomy is not justifiable.

AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Gallbladder perforation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy with spillage of bile and gallstones occurs in up to 40% of patients. Several reports have recently been published describing complications related to these lost gallstones. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of this complication in our patients. METHODS: A prospectively maintained database of 856 laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed between 1989 and 1996 by a single surgeon was analyzed. RESULTS: The number of perforations resulting in loss of stones in the abdominal cavity was 16% (165 patients). Of these 165 patients, only a single patient could be identified as having a long-term complication. CONCLUSIONS: Intra-abdominal lost gallstones can produce complications secondary to migration and erosion. It is prudent to make a concerted effort to remove spilled gallstones by every possible means but conversion to laparotomy is not justifiable.

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