Student understanding of the relationship between the health professions and the pharmaceutical industry

Michael S. Monaghan, Kimberly A. Galt, Paul D. Turner, Bruce L. Houghton, Eugene C. Rich, Ronald J. Markert, Brenda Bergman-Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pharmaceutical sales representatives and direct-to-consumer advertising may influence physician practices, particularly prescribing. Identifying the relevant knowledge and attitudes students possess about the pharmaceutical industry may help professional curricula address these influences. Purposes: To assess knowledge and attitudes toward pharmaceutical industry marketing, ethical principles guiding drug company interactions, pharmaceutical sales representatives as a source of drug information, and confidence level in addressing consumers seeking a prescription from a direct-to-consumer advertisement among senior-level medical, PharmD, and nurse practitioner students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to assess student knowledge and attitudes of four domains associated with the pharmaceutical industry. Results: Significant deficiencies were noted in student knowledge of pharmaceutical marketing expenditures, professional ethics regarding interactions with drug companies, and accuracy of drug information from sales representatives. Conclusions: Health professional students' knowledge and attitudes toward the pharmaceutical industry are formed prior to graduation. Professional curricula must address the influences of sales representatives before postgraduate training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2003

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Health Occupations
sales representative
pharmaceutical industry
Drug Industry
profession
Students
pharmaceutical
drug
health
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Marketing
Drug Interactions
student
Curriculum
marketing
Professional Ethics
curriculum
professional ethics
Nurse Practitioners
Health Expenditures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Student understanding of the relationship between the health professions and the pharmaceutical industry. / Monaghan, Michael S.; Galt, Kimberly A.; Turner, Paul D.; Houghton, Bruce L.; Rich, Eugene C.; Markert, Ronald J.; Bergman-Evans, Brenda.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 1, 12.2003, p. 14-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monaghan, MS, Galt, KA, Turner, PD, Houghton, BL, Rich, EC, Markert, RJ & Bergman-Evans, B 2003, 'Student understanding of the relationship between the health professions and the pharmaceutical industry', Teaching and Learning in Medicine, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 14-20.
Monaghan, Michael S. ; Galt, Kimberly A. ; Turner, Paul D. ; Houghton, Bruce L. ; Rich, Eugene C. ; Markert, Ronald J. ; Bergman-Evans, Brenda. / Student understanding of the relationship between the health professions and the pharmaceutical industry. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 14-20.
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