Teaching approaches and occupational therapy psychoeducation

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patient education has become an important feature of any treatment program. Psychoeducational procedures dominate the treatment used by occupational therapy practitioners in psychiatric rehabilitation. Occupational therapy literature frequently describes the content of psychoeducational programs but rarely examines the teaching approach therapists use in them. It is necessary, therefore, to begin carefully questioning how we are approaching psychoeducation and justifying it as a method compatible with our basic philosophical principles and our growing understanding of occupation. Three approaches to teaching are examined and contrasted with occupational therapy values: the executive approach, the therapist approach, and the liberationist approach. Each of these approaches points to dramatically different outcomes of the therapeutic process. Ultimately, they bring into question the way in which we build a relationship with our clients. The liberationist approach is proposed as the best guide of how and why to use psychoeducation in the quest for providing authentic occupational therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-95
Number of pages15
JournalOccupational Therapy in Mental Health
Volume17
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Occupational Therapy
Teaching
Patient Education
Occupations
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Teaching approaches and occupational therapy psychoeducation. / Padilla, Rene.

In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, Vol. 17, No. 3-4, 2001, p. 81-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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