The clinical doctorate

A framework for analysis in physical therapist education

Joseph Threlkeld, Gail Jensen, Charlotte Brasic Royeen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores major considerations for analysis and discussion of the role of the clinical doctorate as the first professional degree in physical therapist education (DPT). A process for this analysis is posed based on a conceptual framework developed by Stark, Lowther, Hagerty, and Orczyk through grounded theory research on professional education. External influences from society and the profession, institutional and programmatic influences, and articulation of critical dimensions of professional competence and professional attitudes as major categories are discussed in relation to the DPT. A series of questions generated from the application of the model are put forth for continued discussion and deliberation concerning the DPT. We conclude that the DPT provides the best pathway to serve society, the patient, and the profession.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-581
Number of pages15
JournalPhysical Therapy
Volume79
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physical Education and Training
Physical Therapists
Professional Competence
Professional Education
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The clinical doctorate : A framework for analysis in physical therapist education. / Threlkeld, Joseph; Jensen, Gail; Royeen, Charlotte Brasic.

In: Physical Therapy, Vol. 79, No. 6, 06.1999, p. 567-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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