The effect of mobilization on cervical headaches

S. K. Schoensee, Gail Jensen, G. Nicholson, M. Gossman, C. Katholi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Headaches of cervical origin am often treated with mobilization. Mobilization of the upper cervical spine, occiput-C3, and effect on frequency, duration, and intensity of cervical headaches were studied utilizing an A-B-A single case design. Ten subjects who met the operational criteria of cervical headaches completed the study. A headache log was used to document headache frequency, duration, and intensity throughout all three phases (A-B-A). The baseline phase (A) lasted approximately 1 month, and no intervention was performed. The intervention phase (B) consisted of 9-12 treatment sessions, two times per week for 3 4 weeks. Visual analysis of data plots revealed a decrease in headache frequency, duration, and intensity from the baseline phase to the treatment phase. This improvement continued through the second A phase for frequency but leveled off for both duration and intensity. A one-way analysis of variance supported the findings from the visual analysis. In these 10 subjects, mobilization had a therapeutic effect on cervical headaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-196
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume21
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Headache
Therapeutic Uses
Analysis of Variance
Spine
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Schoensee, S. K., Jensen, G., Nicholson, G., Gossman, M., & Katholi, C. (1995). The effect of mobilization on cervical headaches. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 21(4), 184-196.

The effect of mobilization on cervical headaches. / Schoensee, S. K.; Jensen, Gail; Nicholson, G.; Gossman, M.; Katholi, C.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 21, No. 4, 1995, p. 184-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schoensee, SK, Jensen, G, Nicholson, G, Gossman, M & Katholi, C 1995, 'The effect of mobilization on cervical headaches', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 184-196.
Schoensee SK, Jensen G, Nicholson G, Gossman M, Katholi C. The effect of mobilization on cervical headaches. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 1995;21(4):184-196.
Schoensee, S. K. ; Jensen, Gail ; Nicholson, G. ; Gossman, M. ; Katholi, C. / The effect of mobilization on cervical headaches. In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 1995 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 184-196.
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