The Health Care Status of the Diabetic Population as Reflected by Physician Claims to a Major Insurer

Marc Rendell, Donald B. Kimmel, Ola Bamisedun, E. Terrence O’donnell, John Fulmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Conventional epidemiologic data suggest that diabetic patients use more health care resources than nondiabetic patients, yet overall health care use by diabetic individuals has never been fully quantitated. We took a new approach to this issue based on the actual economics of the provision of health care to diabetic insured individuals. Methods: The claims records in the Mutual of Omaha Current Trends database, which contains information on more than 400 000 individuals, were surveyed to identify patients with diabetes and create the contrast population of nondiabetic patients by exclusion. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes and Physicians’ Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition, codes were used to determine all diagnoses recorded and all physician services rendered to the contrast populations. Age- and sex-adjusted comparisons were performed using Mantel-Haenszel procedures to determine an adjusted odds ratio (AOR). Results: A total of 13 304 diabetic individuals and 388 053 nondiabetic individuals who received health care services from January 1, 1988, to January 1, 1989, were identified. Diabetic insured individuals constituted 3.1% of the overall insured population yet accounted for 8.3% of the charges (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1360-1366
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume153
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 14 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Insurance Carriers
Health Status
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Population
Current Procedural Terminology
Health Resources
International Classification of Diseases
Health Services
Odds Ratio
Economics
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The Health Care Status of the Diabetic Population as Reflected by Physician Claims to a Major Insurer. / Rendell, Marc; Kimmel, Donald B.; Bamisedun, Ola; O’donnell, E. Terrence; Fulmer, John.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 153, No. 11, 14.06.1993, p. 1360-1366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rendell, Marc ; Kimmel, Donald B. ; Bamisedun, Ola ; O’donnell, E. Terrence ; Fulmer, John. / The Health Care Status of the Diabetic Population as Reflected by Physician Claims to a Major Insurer. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1993 ; Vol. 153, No. 11. pp. 1360-1366.
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