The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis and treatment of osteoporosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well recognized that patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis usually exhibit some degree of calcium malabsorption and commonly have low serum concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol). Administration of calcitriol has been shown to normalize calcium absorption in patients with osteoporosis and, over the long term may have a stimulating effect on bone formation. Clinical trials have shown a significant reduction in osteoporotic fractures among calcitriol-treated patients. Hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria are infrequent complications of calcitriol therapy with physiologic doses (0.25 μg twice daily), and are most commonly related to excessive calcium intake (i.e., > 1000 mg daily).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-18
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume23
Issue numberSUPPL. 45
StatePublished - Aug 1996

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Calcitriol
Vitamin D
Osteoporosis
Calcium
Hypercalciuria
Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
Osteoporotic Fractures
Hypercalcemia
Therapeutics
Osteogenesis
Clinical Trials
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis and treatment of osteoporosis. / Gallagher, John Christopher G.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 23, No. SUPPL. 45, 08.1996, p. 15-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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